cut and run

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cut and run

1. Literally, to depart very quickly. The robbers cut and run when they heard the approaching sirens.
2. By extension, to leave a situation or arrangement as soon as things go awry. I don't trust that investor, and I expect him to cut and run as soon our company's stock dips the slightest bit.
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cut and run

Sl. to run away quickly. (Alludes to cutting loose a ship's or boat's anchor and sailing away in a hurry.) Wilbur decided to cut and run when he heard the police sirens. As soon as I finish what I am doing here, I'm going to cut and run. I've got to get home by six o'clock.
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cut and run

Clear out, escape, desert, as in He wished he could just cut and run. This term originally (about 1700) meant to cut a vessel's anchor cable and make sail at once. By the mid-1800s it was being used figuratively. Charles Dickens had it in Great Expectations (1861): "I'd give a shilling if they had cut and run." Also see cut out, def. 7.
See also: and, cut, run

cut and run

If someone decides to cut and run from a difficult situation, they suddenly escape from it in order to avoid dealing with it in a responsible way. In relationships, he had an unfortunate tendency to cut and run when things didn't go his way. America will see the job through — we will not cut and run. Note: Cut-and-run can also be used before a noun. These are the consequences of the government's cut-and-run policy. Note: In the past, ships' anchors were attached to ropes. If a warship was attacked, rather than causing delay by pulling up the anchor, the sailors would sometimes cut the rope.
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cut and run

make a speedy or sudden departure from an awkward or hazardous situation rather than confront or deal with it. informal
Cut and run was originally an early 18th-century nautical phrase, meaning ‘sever the anchor cable because of an emergency and make sail immediately’.
See also: and, cut, run

cut and ˈrun

(informal) make a quick or sudden escape: She can’t rely on Jason — he’s the type to cut and run as soon as things get difficult.
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cut and run

in. to stop what one is doing and flee. The cops were coming, so we cut and run.
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cut and run

To leave an unsettled situation or abandon a risky enterprise.
See also: and, cut, run