cut off

(redirected from cuts us off)

cut off

1. verb Literally, to remove something from something else by cutting. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." Your plant might bloom again if you cut off the dead flowers.
2. verb To abruptly move in front of another driver, either intentionally or unintentionally. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." Can you believe that jerk cut me off like that? I nearly hit him!
3. verb To interrupt one and stop them from talking. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." After my mom had been droning on for nearly five minutes, I just had to cut her off. Hey, don't cut me off—I'm not done my story.
4. verb To stop something from working; to turn something off. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." When the fuse blew, it cut off the power to the entire second floor. Look, if you don't pay your bill, the electric company will cut off your electricity.
5. verb To stop giving money to someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." My parents have threatened to cut me off as soon as I turn 30, so I need to find a job. If the school board cuts off funding for the arts, then what will become of the theater program?
6. verb To change direction. Follow the river to where it cuts off to the left and then you'll see the picnic area.
7. verb To turn off a particular road. And then you cut off here and get on this dirt road. I swear we're almost there.
8. verb To prevent access to a particular area or thing. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." I had to take a detour because the water department had blocked a bunch of streets, cutting me off from my house.
9. verb To isolate or sequester someone. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." The investigators plan to cut the suspect off from his bosses, in the hope that he will confess.
10. verb To end unexpectedly or abruptly. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." No one was disappointed when the principal's microphone came unplugged, cutting off his speech. Aw man, why did the music cut off?
11. verb To intercept something The humanitarian supplies
12. In baseball, to intercept a ball that has been thrown to a different player. The shortstop cut off the throw from the outfield, but the runner had already scored.
13. verb To disinherit or disown someone. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." If you continue to fight with your mother like this, she may just cut you off and leave you with nothing.
14. verb To stop serving one alcohol, typically because they are intoxicated. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." They're going to cut off Tina if she keeps acting like that in here.
15. adjective Indicating an end point for something. In this usage, the phrase is usually written as one word. The cutoff date for the contest is tomorrow, so I hope you've finished your entry.
16. adjective In baseball, describing one who intercepts a ball thrown to a different player. In this usage, the phrase is usually written as one word. The shortstop acted as the cutoff man and then threw the ball to the catcher.
17. adjective Too intoxicated to keep being served alcohol. When I nearly fell off my stool for the third time, the bartender told me that I was cut off.
18. noun The act of ending or stopping something. In this usage, the phrase is usually written as one word. If there is a cutoff of funding, then what will become of the theater program?
19. noun A deadline. In this usage, the phrase is usually written as one word. When is the cutoff for applications to be sent in?
20. noun Pants that have been cut into shorts, typically with a ragged hem. In this usage, the phrase is usually written as one word and pluralized ("cutoffs"). I had only brought jeans with me on the trip, and it was so hot that I had to turn them into cutoffs.
See also: cut, off

cut someone or something off (from something)

to block or isolate someone or something from some place or something. They cut the cattle off from the wheat field. The enemy tanks cut off the troops from their camp.
See also: cut, off

cut someone or something off (short)

Fig. to interrupt someone or something; to prevent someone from continuing to speak. (See also chop someone off.) In the middle of her sentence, the teacher cut her off short. Bob cut off Mary when she was trying to explain.
See also: cut, off

cut something off

 
1. to shorten something. Cut this board off a bit, would you? Cut off this board a little, please.
2. to turn something off, such as power, electricity, water, the engine, etc. Would you please cut that engine off? Cut off the engine, Chuck.
See also: cut, off

cut off

 
1. to stop by itself or oneself. The machine got hot and cut off. Bob cut off in midsentence.
2. to turn off a road, path, highway, etc. This is the place where you are supposed to cut off. When you come to a cutoff on the left, continue on for about mile.
See also: cut, off

cut off

1. Separate from others, isolate, as in The construction debris cut off the workers from the canteen, or The new sect was cut off from the church. [Late 1500s]
2. Stop suddenly, discontinue, as in He quickly cut off the engine, or The drama was cut off by a news flash about tornado warnings. [Late 1500s]
3. Shut off, bar, Their phone was cut off when they didn't pay the bill, or Tom's father threatened to cut off his allowance. [c. 1600]
4. Interrupt the course or passage of, intercept, as in The operator cut us off, or The shortstop cut off the throw to the plate. [Late 1500s]
5. Also, cut off with a shilling or cent . Disinherit, as in Grandfather cut him off with a shilling. This usage dates from the early 1700s; the purpose of bequeathing one shilling (a small sum) was to indicate that the heir had not been overlooked but was intentionally being disinherited. In America cent was substituted from about 1800 on.
See also: cut, off

cut off

v.
1. To remove something by cutting: I cut off the tree branch. He cut his beard off.
2. To interrupt someone who is speaking: Don't cut me off like that. The speaker was cut off by the crowd. The principal cut off the discussion when the assembly started.
3. To separate someone from others; isolate someone: I don't want to cut my brother off from his friends. She was cut off from her family while she was gone. All contact was cut off.
4. To stop something from functioning by disconnecting it from its source of power: Cut the power off. The landlord cut off the heat. The lights got cut off.
5. To interrupt the course or passage of something: The infielder cut off the throw to the plate. The police cut all the routes of escape off.
6. To interrupt or break the line of communication of someone: The telephone operator cut us off. The storm cut off the phone lines.
7. To stop or come to an end suddenly: The music suddenly cut off.
8. To change from one direction to another: The road goes straight over the hill and then cuts off to the right around the pond.
9. To disinherit someone: They cut their heirs off without a cent. My parents changed their will and cut me off after I left home.
10. To discontinue the funding for something, such as a government program: School breakfasts were cut off after the funding cuts. The mayor cut off free school lunches from the budget.
11. To drive into the space in front of a moving car, often suddenly and recklessly: That taxi cut me off on the highway. The truck cut off the small car abruptly.
See also: cut, off
References in classic literature ?
No more be mention'd then of violence Against our selves, and wilful barrenness, That cuts us off from hope, and savours onely Rancor and pride, impatience and despite, Reluctance against God and his just yoke Laid on our Necks.
The current road is dangerous, of poor quality and cuts us off from the rest of the island," he said.
Of course, we never stop to think of that when someone cuts us off on the freeway or gives us a hard time, but if we did, dealing with the real issues would help defuse the anger.
At this point, Stewart's film works to mirror Bahari's deprivation; it cuts us off from the outside world, too, the camera rarely venturing anywhere Bahari can't.
Whether it is a driver who cuts us off, a misunderstanding with a friend, or the slight by a co-worker--all are opportunities for love and compassion.
This is costing us over 2,000 extra jobs and it cuts us off from 100-plus new economic centres.
In this view, "theory" is just a layer of obfuscation that needlessly cuts us off from the satisfaction of seeing ourselves in the past.
When we suffer the loss of friends or reputation, or feel the harrowing absence of the person we love the most, or realize how essentially incommunicable one person's experience of life is to another, or remind ourselves how death cuts us off from all that is dear and familiar, it.
We are governed by fear, she said, "And the problem with being in a country that is being guided by fear is that it cuts us off from one another.
The ghettoisation of parents with their 'own kind' cuts us off from the real world of nights out and culture - and instead leaves us discussing the latest advances in potty training, organic baby food and.
In other words, something which has its roots in what has gone before and is, to all intents and purposes, a living organism reflecting the fundamental nature of our humanity, to a 'genetically modified'approach, which cuts us off from all our cultural and historical heritage and relies on `clinical experimentation'.
Both warn of the dangers of a way of life in which human hubris, knowing no bounds, increasingly cuts us off from nature and the rest of the animal world.
The inhuman efficiency of the ATM cuts us off from more people than just bank tellers; we don't find out if our banks are closing out the lives of our neighbors by redlining low-income communities.
This influence cuts us off from everything; it follows us up from childhood to manhood; it excludes us from all stations of profit, usefulness and honor; takes away from us all motive for pressing forward in enterprises, useful and important to the world and to ourselves.
Remember Helen Keller: "Blindness cuts us off from things, but deafness cuts us off from people.