cut to the chase

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cut to the chase

slang To reach the most important points quickly. This phrase is often used as an imperative. Come on, cut to the chase already—what exactly are you trying to ask me? I'm a very busy woman, so I need an assistant who can cut to the chase. I'm a very busy woman, so I need an assistant who can cut to the chase.
See also: chase, cut

cut to the chase

Sl. to focus on what is important; to abandon the preliminaries and deal with the major points. All right, let's stop the idle chatter and cut to the chase. After a few introductory comments, we cut to the chase and began negotiating.
See also: chase, cut

cut to the chase

Get to the point, get on with it, as in We don't have time to go into that, so let's cut to the chase. This usage alludes to editing (cutting) film so as to get to the exciting chase scene in a motion picture. [Slang; 1920s]
See also: chase, cut

cut to the chase

If you cut to the chase, you start talking about or dealing with what is really important, instead of less important things. I'll cut to the chase — we just don't have enough money for the project. Solo cut to the chase: `Well, it looks like there is nothing here for me so I'm going to fly back home.' Note: In films, when one scene ends and another begins the action is said to `cut' from one scene to the next. If a film `cuts to the chase', it moves on to a car chase scene. This expression compares the important matters to be discussed or dealt with to the exciting action in a film, such as car chases.
See also: chase, cut

cut to the chase

come to the point. North American informal
In this idiom, cut is being used in the cinematographic sense ‘move to another shot in a film’. Chase scenes are a particularly exciting feature of some films, and the idiom expresses the idea of ignoring any preliminaries and coming immediately to the most important part.
See also: chase, cut

cut to the ˈchase

(informal, especially American English) stop wasting time and do or say the important things that need to be done or said: Let’s cut to the chase. How much is it going to cost me?
A film/movie often cuts (= changes) from a slow scene to a more exciting one, such as a car chase, to keep the audience interested.
See also: chase, cut

cut to the chase

in. to focus on what is important; to abandon the preliminaries and deal with the major points. After a few introductory comments, we cut to the chase and began negotiating.
See also: chase, cut

cut to the chase

To get to the matter at hand.
See also: chase, cut