cut to the chase

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cut to the chase

slang To reach the most important points quickly. This phrase is often used as an imperative. Come on, cut to the chase already—what exactly are you trying to ask me? I'm a very busy woman, so I need an assistant who can cut to the chase.
See also: chase, cut
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

cut to the chase

Sl. to focus on what is important; to abandon the preliminaries and deal with the major points. All right, let's stop the idle chatter and cut to the chase. After a few introductory comments, we cut to the chase and began negotiating.
See also: chase, cut
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cut to the chase

Get to the point, get on with it, as in We don't have time to go into that, so let's cut to the chase. This usage alludes to editing (cutting) film so as to get to the exciting chase scene in a motion picture. [Slang; 1920s]
See also: chase, cut
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cut to the chase

If you cut to the chase, you start talking about or dealing with what is really important, instead of less important things. I'll cut to the chase — we just don't have enough money for the project. Solo cut to the chase: `Well, it looks like there is nothing here for me so I'm going to fly back home.' Note: In films, when one scene ends and another begins the action is said to `cut' from one scene to the next. If a film `cuts to the chase', it moves on to a car chase scene. This expression compares the important matters to be discussed or dealt with to the exciting action in a film, such as car chases.
See also: chase, cut
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

cut to the chase

come to the point. North American informal
In this idiom, cut is being used in the cinematographic sense ‘move to another shot in a film’. Chase scenes are a particularly exciting feature of some films, and the idiom expresses the idea of ignoring any preliminaries and coming immediately to the most important part.
See also: chase, cut
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

cut to the ˈchase

(informal, especially American English) stop wasting time and do or say the important things that need to be done or said: Let’s cut to the chase. How much is it going to cost me?
A film/movie often cuts (= changes) from a slow scene to a more exciting one, such as a car chase, to keep the audience interested.
See also: chase, cut
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

cut to the chase

in. to focus on what is important; to abandon the preliminaries and deal with the major points. After a few introductory comments, we cut to the chase and began negotiating.
See also: chase, cut
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

cut to the chase

To get to the matter at hand.
See also: chase, cut
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cut to the chase

Get on with it, get to the point. This phrase, often an imperative, comes from the film industry of the 1920s, where it means to edit (“cut”) film so as to get to an exciting chase sequence, an intrinsic part of many early movies. It gradually became more general in meaning, as in “She went on and on about her vacation, until I told her to cut to the chase and tell us where she stayed.”
See also: chase, cut
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Adam Posen cuts to the chase, while David Hale shocks with his latest provocative observation.
In its bluntly titled report Nursing Homes: Public Reporting of Quality Indicators Has Merit, but National Implementation Is Premature, the GAO quickly cuts to the chase: "CMS has not yet adequately resolved a number of open issues regarding the appropriateness of the quality indicators selected for public reporting and the accuracy of the underlying data." The GAO also criticizes CMS for not providing the QM data in the six pilot states in an accurate, consumer-friendly manner.
He is, in this video, assuming you have been to Thunder Ranch and are familiar with his shooting house, "The Terminator." This video cuts to the chase after reminding you of the Four Basic Safety rules and a review of the classroom material.
Bao then cuts to the chase, glossing over the minor stylistic differences between each model, concentrating instead on its core mythos, its caricatured signature by which it is best known and most revered.
"Four years ago it was one of the most difficult tasks I've ever really had to put my mind to According to Schmidt, TURN TO PAGE 36 joe cutS to the chASe deliver." Not surprisingly, Schmidt will ring the changes for the next Test at Twickenham on Saturday week.
Our guide cuts to the chase, taking an organisation systematically through every one of the Combined Code's provisions.