cut away

(redirected from cuts away)

cut away

1. To cut two things apart. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "away." I think that cutting away this part of the bush will bring more light into the house.
2. In film, TV, or video editing, to interrupt a sequence by showing something else, typically something related to the main sequence. My favorite part in this scene is when it cuts away to the shadow on the wall—it's so eerie!
See also: away, cut

cut something away (from something)

to separate something from something by cutting. The doctor cut the wart away from the patient's foot. She cut away the loose thread.
See also: away, cut
References in periodicals archive ?
Earth Therapeutics tweezers have been tested for accuracy and the nail clipper easily and efficiently cuts away stubborn nails.
"Catch the Dukakis Magic--Then, let us know where you found it." Or try the C-SPAN Drinking Game, where players imbibe "every time Congress appropriates an additional quarter-billion dollars" or whenever the camera cuts away to a shot of Senator Edward Kennedy napping.
Recall that while Senate Democrats didn't have the votes to block the president's tax bill, those who ultimately did vote for it were able, by teaming up with moderate Republicans, to shift some of the cuts away from future rate reductions for the rich to immediate tax rebates for average Americans.
As he cuts away Bourne's wetsuit, two bloody bullet wounds in his back are revealed - but since there do not appear to be any bullet holes in the actual wetsuit just how did the shots get through to his flesh?
And in Eban and Charley, Bolton purposely cuts away from actual sex so as not to lose the film's focus on the couple's underlying emotional drama.
Luckily he cuts away to other perspectives; for instance, a crucifixion scene with three ropes in lieu of crosses on which the choreographer and two other robed/hooded dancers go through some thoroughly dramatic maneuverings.
And when Lynch cuts away from an aerial shot of the septuagenarian crossing the Mississippi to a view of a pitch-dark cemetery.