cut-off point


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cut-off point

The limit beyond which no further action is permitted or possible. I'm sorry to say that we've reached our cut-off point for accepting applications this year.
See also: point
References in periodicals archive ?
To our knowledge, no study in literature has determined the cut-off points of PAR index according to Angle classification.
However, its cut-off points are yet to be established as there are wide variations in accordance to geographic and racial differences.
We sought to find an appropriate cut-off point for this population sample, applying the 6 phenotypes previously described in a stepwise manner.
Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the predictive ability and identify age cut-off points for the absence of frailty in elderly people from both genders.
This cut-off point seems to be universally accepted, and for the time being represents the best-known criterion for defining acute leukemia; however, "arbitrary" may still precede the criterion due to the follow:
For the most appropriate cut-off points in predictive pressure ulcer risk assessment for SICU patients, the current study suggests cut-off point of 14 for the Braden scale, 21 for the Song and Choi scale and 28 for the Cubbin and Jackson scale.
The original cut-off point of October 1 will now run until November 1 after councils asked for more time to respond, BT said today.
Compared with other similar awards, the under 45 age limit might seem like an optimistically elastic definition of young, but since only built work is eligible for consideration, the mid forties cut-off point acknowledges the length of time it takes to study, qualify and become established as a serious practising architect.
The first cut-off point of the sample is placed at a position 2 m or less inside of end <A> above, and the final cut-off point at a position 2 m or less inside of end <B> above.
In some studies delay has been considered a continuous variable (usually in days) without an explicit cut-off point between participants considered as "delayers" or "nondelayers." While others use a cut-off to separate discrete groups of "delayers" and "nondelayers," there seems to be little consensus within the literature as to what constitutes delay.
He assigns each animal an "autonomy value" and asks which value is the cut-off point for treating animals as non-intelligent beings, unworthy of rights.
n INCAPACITY BENEFIT is means-tested and your income puts you above the cut-off point for it.
Using a cut-off point of 1.501 (Hair, Anderson, Tatham, & Black, 1995), five items failed to load on any factor.
But the first priority has to be 40 points, which is what they call the cut-off point for safety."