cut someone some slack, to

cut someone some slack

INFORMAL
If you cut someone some slack, you are less critical of their behaviour or performance than usual because you know they are in a difficult situation. When you're new at a job, colleagues and bosses cut you some slack. They forgive minor mistakes because you're new. Note: This expression is variable. Instead of some, people sometimes use words such as a little or a lot of. She's still upset about her dad. Cut her a little slack.
See also: cut, slack, someone

cut someone some slack

allow someone some leeway; make allowances for someone's behaviour. North American informal
1998 Times Most, though, are willing to cut Spielberg some slack for the sake of cinematic interpretation.
See also: cut, slack, someone

cut someone some slack

verb
See also: cut, slack, someone

cut someone some slack, to

To give someone more time or more of a chance, to ease up on someone. This term, dating from the mid-1900s, alludes to a slackening of tautness in a rope or sail. Sandra Brown had it in Alibi (1999), “‘Don’t lean on him yet; let’s cut him some slack for now.’”
See also: cut, someone