cut one

cut one

slang To pass gas (fart). All right, who cut one in here?
See also: cut, one

cut one

verb
See also: cut, one
References in classic literature ?
Hesiod's diction is in the main Homeric, but one of his charms is the use of quaint allusive phrases derived, perhaps, from a pre- Hesiodic peasant poetry: thus the season when Boreas blows is the time when `the Boneless One gnaws his foot by his fireless hearth in his cheerless house'; to cut one's nails is `to sever the withered from the quick upon that which has five branches'; similarly the burglar is the `day-sleeper', and the serpent is the `hairless one'.
It is allowed on all hands, that the primitive way of breaking eggs, before we eat them, was upon the larger end; but his present majesty's grandfather, while he was a boy, going to eat an egg, and breaking it according to the ancient practice, happened to cut one of his fingers.
Then, indeed, does she captivate all hearts by her condescension, by her girlish vivacity, and by her skipping about as in the days when the hideous old general with the mouth too full of teeth had not cut one of them at two guineas each.
At last he cut one of the pin ropes, raised the bottom of the canvas, and intruded his head within the interior.
Stand upon your head agin, and I'll cut one of your feet off.'
I took from my waistcoat-pocket a pen-knife, opened it, grasped the poor beast by the throat, and deliberately cut one of its eyes from the socket!
"I will now cut one of these pills in two," said Holmes, and drawing his penknife he suited the action to the word.
When we had made an end of our meal, my uncle Ebenezer unlocked a drawer, and drew out of it a clay pipe and a lump of tobacco, from which he cut one fill before he locked it up again.
Bumble, turning up his coat-collar, 'enough to cut one's ears off.'
He then immediately stepped up to him who had stopped us, as I said, and before he could come forward again, made a blow at him with a scimitar, which he always wore, but missing the man, struck his horse in the side of his head, cut one of the ears off by the root, and a great slice down by the side of his face.
"Would 'La Longue Carbine' cut one so slight on an enemy?"
If I see a stump, I took it for a man; if I trod on a stick and broke it, it made me feel like a person had cut one of my breaths in two and I only got half, and the short half, too.
"Now," quoth Little John, "it doth seem to me that instead of striving to cut one another's throats, it were better for us to be boon companions.
Having cut one of them transversely into two nearly equal parts, in the course of a fortnight both had the shape of perfect animals.
One must cut one's coat according to one's cloth, but what about you, Mr.