cut (one) to the quick

(redirected from cut her to the quick)

cut (one) to the quick

1. To slice a part of the body very deeply. Be careful—one slip of that knife and you'll cut yourself to the quick.
2. To strike the deepest, most fragile part of one. Typically used to describe emotional wounds. I can't even look at her right now—that hurtful remark cut me right to the quick.
See also: cut, quick
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

cut someone to the quick

 and cut someone to the bone 
1. Lit. to slice the flesh of someone or some animal clear through to the underlying layer of flesh or to the bone. With the very sharp knife, David cut the beast to the quick in one blow. He cut his finger to the quick with the sharp knife.
2. Fig. to injure someone emotionally. (See also cut something to the bone.) Your heartless comments cut me to the quick. Her remarks cut him to the bone.
See also: cut, quick
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cut to the quick

Deeply wound or distress, as in His criticism cut her to the quick. This phrase uses the quick in the sense of a vital or a very sensitive part of the body, such as under the fingernails. It also appeared in such older locutions as touched to the quick, for "deeply affected," and stung to the quick, for "wounded, distressed," both dating from the early 1500s. The current expression was considered a cliché from about 1850 on.
See also: cut, quick
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cut someone to the quick

If something cuts you to the quick, it makes you very upset. The cruelty of their words cut me to the quick. That tone of hers always cut him to the quick. Note: The quick is the very sensitive flesh under the fingernails or toenails.
See also: cut, quick, someone
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

cut someone to the quick

cause someone deep distress by a hurtful remark or action.
Quick means an area of flesh that is well supplied with nerves and therefore very sensitive to touch or injury.
See also: cut, quick, someone
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

cut somebody to the ˈquick

hurt somebody’s feelings; offend somebody deeply: It cut her to the quick to hear him criticizing her family like that.
The quick is the soft, sensitive flesh that is under your nails.
See also: cut, quick, somebody
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

cut to the quick

To be deeply wounded; to have one’s feelings hurt. The noun “quick” means the living, as well as the most vital and important part; today it also means the very sensitive flesh between the fingernails and skin. To be touched to the quick, meaning to be deeply affected, has been used since the sixteenth century; it appears in John Heywood’s Proverbs and in several places in Shakespeare’s plays (Hamlet, The Comedy of Errors, and others). Another version is stung to the quick, as in “The last appellation stung her to the quick” (Henry Fielding, Joseph Andrews, 1742). “Cut to the quick” is a still later wording and has been a cliché since about 1850. See also quick and the dead.
See also: cut, quick
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in classic literature ?
He had been in a particularly ugly mood, and a final harshness and unfairness cut her to the quick.
These angry symptoms were keenly observed by Maggie, and cut her to the quick. Tom, it appeared, was supposed capable of turning his father out of doors, and of making the future in some way tragic by his wickedness.
Those unkind comments about her age must have cut her to the quick. Yet, unlike many stars, she was too professional to ever let on.
Well, she's a bit fat and a bit nothing really." Those cruel comments cut her to the quick.
It was a harsh lesson, and one that cut her to the quick. After that, Ada hardened her heart and vowed never to be hurt again.
'Hell hath no fury like an ex-wife run to fat,' quipped Burchill's former husband Tony Parsons in their on-going war of words and it was this line that probably cut her to the quick.