cut corners, to

cut corners

To skip certain steps in order to do something as easily or cheaply as possible, usually to the detriment of the finished product or end result. Don't cut corners on this project—it has to be done thoroughly, no matter the cost. If you cut corners and don't apply a top coat, then your nails probably are going to chip faster.
See also: corner, cut
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

cut corners

Fig. to take shortcuts; to save money or effort by finding cheaper or easier ways to do something. They're always finding ways to cut corners. I won't cut corners just to save money. I put quality first.
See also: corner, cut
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cut corners

Do something in the easiest or least expensive way; also, act illegally. For example, Cutting corners in production led to a definite loss in product quality, or If the accountant cuts corners the auditors are sure to find out. This term alludes to rounding a corner as closely as possible in order to shorten the distance traversed and/or save time. [Late 1800s]
See also: corner, cut
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cut corners

COMMON If you cut corners, you save time, money, or effort by not following the correct procedure or rules for doing something. Don't try to cut corners as you'll only be making work for yourself later on. He accused the Home Office of trying to save money by cutting corners on security. Note: You can call this activity corner cutting. It's precisely this sort of corner cutting that causes the problems. Corner-cutting contractors build tiny classrooms and narrow corridors.
See also: corner, cut
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

cut corners

undertake something in what appears to be the easiest, quickest, or cheapest way, often by omitting to do something important or ignoring rules.
This phrase comes from cutting (off) the corner , which means ‘taking the shortest course by going across and not round a corner’.
See also: corner, cut
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

cut ˈcorners

(disapproving) do things in the easiest, quickest or cheapest way and not in the proper way: Don’t be tempted to cut corners when doing a home decorating job.
See also: corner, cut
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

cut corners

tv. to do something more easily; to take shortcuts; to save money by finding cheaper ways to do something. (As if one were speeding somewhere and took the shortest way possible through intersections, i.e., by making left turns that cut across oncoming traffic lanes.) I won’t cut corners just to save money. I put quality first.
See also: corner, cut
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

cut corners

To do something in the easiest or most inexpensive way.
See also: corner, cut
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cut corners, to

To do a hasty, slipshod job; also, to act illegally. The term comes from using a direct route that omits corners or from moving very fast and rounding turns very closely. It dates from about the middle of the nineteenth century. Mark Twain used it in Innocents Abroad (1869): “He cuts a corner so closely now and then . . . that I feel myself ‘scooching.’”
See also: cut
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
"In order to steal a march on bloggers and tweeters, they might be tempted to cut corners, to break or at least bend the law to obtain information for stories or to infringe privacy improperly to the same end," he said.