cut back to (someone or something)

(redirected from cut back to us)

cut back to (someone or something)

To return to a shot of someone or something, as in TV or film. After that flashback, we'll cut back to the happy couple, who don't look quite so happy anymore.
See also: back, cut

cut back to someone or something

[for a film or television camera] to return to a picture of someone or something. Suddenly, the camera cut back to the reporter, whounprepared—just stood there. The scene cut back to the veranda overlooking the bay.
See also: back, cut
References in periodicals archive ?
"When we had a chance to talk, I said, 'Bob, I've had a sleep and me leg's dead!' It [the camera] cut back to us and he's crying laughing at this stage and said to me, 'What are you up to at the moment?' "They were closing a famous pub in Liverpool called the Legs of Man and there was a campaign at the time, and I said, 'I'm trying to keep the Legs of Man open.' .' I seriously didn't realise [the innuendo]!" After their initial conversation, they teamed up on an act for the BBC's 70th birthday party, performed in clubs, presented a Bafta together, and Paul regularly appeared on Bob's National Lottery show.
"When we had a chance to talk, I said, 'Bob, I've had a sleep and me leg's dead!' The camera cut back to us and he's crying laughing at this stage and said to me, 'What are you up to at the moment?' "They were closing a famous pub in Liverpool called the Legs Of Man and there was a campaign at the time, and I said, 'I'm trying to keep the Legs Of Man open'.
A crow gouges the lead sky now smeared pewter and tungsten with new rips and drags of aluminum every passing second, all alloy and amalgam and fusion, then spit-shined--your shine, my spit--the crow's eye and caw cut back to us after it lights on that limb broken free at the elbow, nubbed like a gray-veined bust, how nature might suppose Balzac caught in his fury if nature could suppose or how I now knot Rodin's Balzac folding into himself with inspiration with the dead white oak's overlapping bark, its chippings and leavings, a slow shed, spread legs, thick arms, necks, our branchings, knuckles, cusps and curls and braids, our inward foldings, our eyes cut away from one another because they must, our clothes shed on the shore.