References in classic literature ?
Indeed, whether on carpets, or curtains, or tapestry, or ottoman coverings, all upholstery of this nature should be rigidly Arabesque.
Behind the curtain all was ready on the full stage.
In the dim shadow of the curtain her luminous eyes shone more brightly than usual from the tears of joy that were in them.
From then, until the curtain went up for the next act, he had only to sit still and listen.
A good deal of hammering went on before the curtain rose again, but when it became evident what a masterpiece of stage carpentery had been got up, no one murmured at the delay.
When I saw "King Lear" played, nobody was allowed to see a scene shifted; if there was nothing to be done but slide a forest out of the way and expose a temple beyond, one did not see that forest split itself in the middle and go shrieking away, with the accompanying disenchanting spectacle of the hands and heels of the impelling impulse--no, the curtain was always dropped for an instant--one heard not the least movement behind it--but when it went up, the next instant, the forest was gone.
He said: "You understand that directly I stooped to pick up that coil of running gear--the spanker foot-outhaul, it was--I perceived that I could see right into that part of the saloon the curtains were meant to make particularly private.
He withdrew the curtains, noticing, to his surprise, the heavy shutters which their folds had partly concealed.
The curtain between the trees was drawn aside, and the shrine was disclosed to view.
An increasing cackle of complaints, orders, and jests, and what to a European would have been bad language, came from behind the curtains.
All you need do to let me know is to undo the cord holding the curtain of the 'right' gallery window, nearest to the dark closet.
Barker drew aside the curtain, and showed that the long, diamond-paned window was open to its full extent.
WELL, all day him and the king was hard at it, rigging up a stage and a curtain and a row of candles for footlights; and that night the house was jam full of men in no time.
I mounted into the window-seat: gathering up my feet, I sat cross-legged, like a Turk; and, having drawn the red moreen curtain nearly close, I was shrined in double retirement.
She could look at it because the curtain had been drawn aside.