curry favour


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Related to curry favour: curry favor

curry favor

To ingratiate oneself to someone Flattery won't work; the only way of currying favor with him is through hard work.
See also: curry, favor

curry favor

Seek gain or advancement by fawning or flattery, as in Edith was famous for currying favor with her teachers. This expression originally came from the Old French estriller fauvel, "curry the fallow horse," a beast that in a 14th-century allegory stood for duplicity and cunning. It came into English about 1400 as curry favel-that is, curry (groom with a currycomb) the animal-and in the 1500s became the present term.
See also: curry, favor

curry favour

ingratiate yourself with someone through obsequious behaviour.
Curry here means ‘groom a horse or other animal’ with a coarse brush or comb. The phrase is an early 16th-century alteration of the Middle English curry favel , Favel (or Fauvel ) being the name of a chestnut horse in an early 14th-century French romance who epitomized cunning and duplicity. From this ‘to groom Favel’ came to mean to use on him the cunning which he personified. It is unclear whether the bad reputation of chestnut horses existed before the French romance, but the idea is also found in 15th-century German in the phrase den fahlen hengst reiten (ride the chestnut horse) meaning ‘behave deceitfully’.
See also: curry, favour

curry ˈfavour (with somebody)

(British English) (American English curry ˈfavor (with somebody)) (disapproving) try to get somebody to like or support you by praising or helping them a lot: They have lowered taxes in an attempt to curry favour with the voters. Curry in this phrase means to groom (= clean and comb) a horse. The phrase was originally ‘curry favel’ (= a light brown horse that was thought to be clever and dishonest) and came to mean to try to please somebody who might be useful to you, especially by doing or saying things that you do not mean or believe.
See also: curry, favour

curry favor

To seek or gain favor by fawning or flattery.
See also: curry, favor

curry favor

To ingratiate oneself through flattery or a willingness to please. “Curry” has nothing to do with the spice—it means to groom, as in the horse-keeping currycomb tool. One of the definitions of “stroke” is “suck up to,” and the image is similar—to get on a person's good side, whether or not flattery is warranted. “Favor” was originally “Fauvel,” the donkey who was the rogue hero of a 14th-century French romance. The image of grooming the beast to get on its good side or to win its favor is now the modern use of the word in the phrase.
See also: curry, favor
References in periodicals archive ?
It is not the duty of the city council to curry favour with any company.
had obviously hired Joseph to curry favour with him, given they were friends.
Fellow Tory Gerald Howarth said: "Most parents will be horrified at the Government's failure to stand up for family values just to curry favour with minority groups.
Mopeds are more normally used by fast-food delivery firms, but the police feel that the mini motor bikes will CURRY favour with the public.
Maybe it's a case of Michel Platini (right) trying to curry favour with as many countries as possible.
KEEN chefs will be using their culinary skills to curry favour in a special contest.
This is a move designed to curry favour with the Muslim community which is anti-Labour following Iraq.
Chefs hope to curry favour in Redcar, where a heat for the National Curry Chef competition was taking place today.
Barcelona accused Moreno of trying to curry favour with the electorate of Quito, the capital city where Deportiva are based and where he is running for office later this year.
Barcelona accused Moreno of trying to curry favour with the electorate of Quito, but Moreno has rejected the accusation, saying his performance was down to ``human error''.
SIR: At school there was a particularly unpopular boy who when trying to curry favour or make new friends would expose his genitals in the playground.
As the terrible consequences of his illjudged attack became clear, Mr Pugh raised a point of order designed to curry favour again with the diary and column writers.
Costcutter is trying to curry favour with the English cricket team -- but not with curry, you understand.
Instead, they increase their share of domestic jobs to curry favour with their wives or girlfriends, mostly before a major sporting event or in advance of a night out with their mates.
Her chance to play the full bhoona and curry favour with panto fans came when she got dolled up as Ginger Spice for her role in Aladdin.