current


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swim with the current

To go along or agree with the prevailing or popularly held opinion or perspective; to act or behave the same way as the majority of others. When I was in college, I used to have a lot of radical opinions and beliefs, but as I've grown older, I find myself swimming with the current more often. I'm sorry, but I simply refuse to swim along with the current just because it's the easier option!
See also: current, swim

against the current

In contradiction to what is popular or expected. It was difficult to go against the current, but, in the end, I was able to get the team to agree that my proposal is a good idea.
See also: current

swim against the current

To go against or disagree with a prevailing or popularly held opinion or perspective; to act or behave contrary to the majority of others. I really swam against the current when I was in college with some radical opinions, but as I've grown older I've found myself falling more in line with others. I don't understand why you always have to swim against the current instead of making things a little easier on yourself!
See also: current, swim

swim against the tide

To go against or disagree with a prevailing or popularly held opinion or perspective; to act or behave contrary to the majority of others. I really swam against the tide when I was in college with some radical opinions, but as I've grown older I've found myself falling more in line with others. I don't understand why you always have to swim against the tide instead of making things a little easier on yourself!
See also: swim, tide

pass current

1. obsolete Of a coin, to have a particular monetary worth. The coin passed current for 21 shillings until the end of the 17th century.
2. near-obsolete To be considered genuine or authentic. What passes current as orthodox religious views these days would be considered quite liberal—downright blasphemous, even—two hundred years ago.
See also: current, pass

swim against the tide

 and swim against the current 
1. Lit. to swim in a direction opposite to the flow of the water. She became exhausted, swimming against the tide. If you really want strenuous exercise, go out in the stream and swim against the current.
2. Fig. to do something that is in opposition to the general movement of things. Why can't you cooperate? Do you always have to swim against the tide? You always seem to waste your energy swimming against the current.
See also: swim, tide

swim against the current

Also, swim against the stream or tide . Go against prevailing opinion or thought, as in I'm voting for him even if that is swimming against the current. Shakespeare used a similar metaphor in 2 Henry IV (5:2): "You must now speak Sir John Falstaff fair, which swims against your stream." For the antonym, see swim with the tide.
See also: current, swim

swim against the tide

If you swim against the tide, you do or say the opposite of what most other people are doing or saying. Sinclair seems to be swimming against the tide by not retiring at 60. Thank you for having the courage to swim against the tide and stand up for the qualities that built this great country. Note: You can also say that someone swims with the tide to mean that they act in the same way as most other people. Many great cathedrals are attempting to swim with the tide and bring in tourists to replace the worshippers who no longer come.
See also: swim, tide

pass current

be generally accepted as true or genuine. British
Pass current originally referred to the currency of a genuine coin, as opposed to a counterfeit one.
See also: current, pass
References in classic literature ?
It obeyed very well, for the current was more sluggish now, and soon they had reached the bank and landed safely.
About four o'clock in the evening, being then within a league of the island, I found the point of the rocks which occasioned this disaster stretching out, as is described before, to the southward, and casting off the current more southerly, had, of course, made another eddy to the north; and this I found very strong, but not directly setting the way my course lay, which was due west, but almost full north.
As to the east side of the island, which I had gone round, I knew well enough there was no venturing that way; my very heart would shrink, and my very blood run chill, but to think of it; and as to the other side of the island, I did not know how it might be there; but supposing the current ran with the same force against the shore at the east as it passed by it on the other, I might run the same risk of being driven down the stream, and carried by the island, as I had been before of being carried away from it: so with these thoughts, I contented myself to be without any boat, though it had been the product of so many months' labour to make it, and of so many more to get it into the sea.
mcCoy was noncommittal, though he said that in the Paumotus there was no reason why it should not be an easterly current.
An easterly current instead of a westerly," said Captain "Davenport, glaring accusingly at McCoy, as if to cast the blame for it upon him.
The Pyrenees was sliding through the water and fighting a current that threatened to set her down upon the breakers.
South of the shoal an easterly current had set them down upon it; north of the shoal an equally swift westerly current had clutched the ship and was sweeping her away.
The current had accelerated, the wind had slackened, and the Pyrenees had sagged off to the west.
He was afraid of that terrible westerly current which had cheated him out of so many ports of refuge.
But the current, sucking between the two islands, swept them to the northwest, and at one in the afternoon they saw the palms of Katiu rise above the sea and sink back into the sea again.
A few minutes later, just as the captain had discovered that a new current from the northeast had gripped the Pyrenees, the masthead lookouts raised cocoanut palms in the northwest.
You are bucking a seven-knot current, Captain," he said.
The man at the wheel had forsaken it in a funk, and Captain Davenport had leaped and caught the spokes in time to prevent the ship from yawing in the current and going ashore.
He missed Takaroa by thirty miles and fetched Tikei, all because of the shifting currents.
And the next moment he was plaintively demanding, "And what are the currents doing?