curiosity

(redirected from curiosities)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

curiosity killed the cat

One's inquisitiveness can be dangerous, especially when it extends to things one does not need to know about. I think you'll offend her by asking such personal questions—curiosity killed the cat, after all. I know curiosity killed the cat, but I can't stop the investigation until I know where the donations are really going.
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

die of curiosity

To die (figuratively) because one is so eager to find out about something. Once I saw all of the presents stacked under the tree, I thought I would die of curiosity before Christmas morning.
See also: curiosity, die, of

Curiosity killed the cat.

Prov. Being curious can get you into trouble. (Often used to warn someone against prying into other's affairs.) Jill: Where did you get all that money? Jane: Curiosity killed the cat.
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

die of curiosity

 and die from curiosity
Fig. to experience a strongly felt need to know about something. I was just dying of curiosity! I almost died from curiosity to finish the book and see how the mystery was solved.
See also: curiosity, die, of

pique someone's curiosity

 and pique someone's interest
to arouse interest; to arouse curiosity. The advertisement piqued my curiosity about the product. The professor tried to pique the students' interest in French literature.
See also: curiosity, pique

curiosity killed the cat

It's best to mind one's own business. For example, Don't ask about his divorce-curiosity killed the cat. This cautionary expression sounds like the moral of some fable or folktale, but any such origin for it has been lost. The first recorded use was in O. Henry's Schools and Schools (1909).
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

curiosity killed the cat

You say curiosity killed the cat to warn someone that they might suffer harm themselves if they try to find out about matters that do not involve them. `Where are we going?' Calder asked. `Curiosity killed the cat, dear. You'll find out soon enough.'
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

curiosity killed the cat

being inquisitive about other people's affairs may get you into trouble. proverb
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

curiosity killed the ˈcat

(saying) used to tell somebody not to ask so many questions, especially in reply to a question that you do not want to answer: ‘Are you two thinking of getting married by any chance?’ ‘Now, now. Curiosity killed the cat!’
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

ˌpique somebody’s ˈinterest, curiˈosity, etc.

(especially American English) make somebody very interested in something: The programme has certainly piqued public interest in this rare bird.
See also: pique
References in classic literature ?
This is a museum of curiosities," said the Voice behind the Veil.
There were small Rajahs, escorts coughing in the veranda, who came to buy curiosities - such as phonographs and mechanical toys.
The only secret of her safety that we could perceive was that Venice contained so many curiosities that were greater than she.
There are some fine views, and not a few natural curiosities which are sure to interest you, if you are a student of natural history--specially of an earlier kind, when the world was younger.
But leaving these curiosities (though not unworthy to be thought on, in fit place), we will handle, what persons are apt to envy others; what persons are most subject to be envied themselves; and what is the difference between public and private envy.
The servants deny having seen it before, but among the numerous curiosities in the house it is possible that it may have been overlooked.
The bed was left in its place; the sofa on which the nurse had snatched her intervals of repose was at its foot; the Indian cabinet, in which the crumpled paper with the grains of arsenic had been found, still held its little collection of curiosities.
The three peas were however put into the cabinet of curiosities, where they are still to be seen, provided they are not lost.
Solving the world's challenges in food production, energy development, and environmental stewardship will depend on following our deepest curiosities into solutions that can make a difference.