curiosity

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curiosity killed the cat

Inquisitiveness can be dangerous, especially when it extends to things one does not need to know about. I think you'll offend her by asking such personal questions—curiosity killed the cat, after all. I know curiosity killed the cat, but I can't stop the investigation until I know where the donations are really going.
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

die of curiosity

To die because one is so eager to know something. Used figuratively and hyperbolically. Once I saw all of the presents stacked under the tree, I thought I would die of curiosity before Christmas morning.
See also: curiosity, die, of

pique (one's) (emotion)

To arouse a particular emotion in one. While the special effects looked impressive, it was the movie's approach to its female characters that piqued my interest. Nothing piques my ire like people who don't use their turn signals when they're driving!
See also: pique

piss in (one's) pocket

slang To attempt to gain someone's favor, affection, attention, or interest, especially through flattering, fawning, or solicitous overtures. Primarily heard in Australia. I'm not just trying to piss in your pocket; you did a really great job! Stop pissing in my pocket, it's not going to help your chances at a promotion.
See also: piss, pocket

Curiosity killed the cat.

Prov. Being curious can get you into trouble. (Often used to warn someone against prying into other's affairs.) Jill: Where did you get all that money? Jane: Curiosity killed the cat.
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

die of curiosity

 and die from curiosity
Fig. to experience a strongly felt need to know about something. I was just dying of curiosity! I almost died from curiosity to finish the book and see how the mystery was solved.
See also: curiosity, die, of

pique someone's curiosity

 and pique someone's interest
to arouse interest; to arouse curiosity. The advertisement piqued my curiosity about the product. The professor tried to pique the students' interest in French literature.
See also: curiosity, pique

curiosity killed the cat

It's best to mind one's own business. For example, Don't ask about his divorce-curiosity killed the cat. This cautionary expression sounds like the moral of some fable or folktale, but any such origin for it has been lost. The first recorded use was in O. Henry's Schools and Schools (1909).
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

curiosity killed the cat

You say curiosity killed the cat to warn someone that they might suffer harm themselves if they try to find out about matters that do not involve them. `Where are we going?' Calder asked. `Curiosity killed the cat, dear. You'll find out soon enough.'
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

curiosity killed the cat

being inquisitive about other people's affairs may get you into trouble. proverb
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

curiosity killed the ˈcat

(saying) used to tell somebody not to ask so many questions, especially in reply to a question that you do not want to answer: ‘Are you two thinking of getting married by any chance?’ ‘Now, now. Curiosity killed the cat!’
See also: cat, curiosity, killed

ˌpique somebody’s ˈinterest, curiˈosity, etc.

(especially American English) make somebody very interested in something: The programme has certainly piqued public interest in this rare bird.
See also: pique
References in periodicals archive ?
Her emphasis on the socially mediated character of the relationship between curiosities and their collectors threatens to empty this relationship of affective content; the collector's avidity for the object itself morphs too quickly and completely into a hunger for status, and we lose a sense of the shaping power of physical things on subjectivity (rather than the other way around).
Swann reveals the force of the etymon cura in John Parkinson's praise of Tradescant as a "painfull industrious searcher," one who "wonderfully labored" on behalf of his elite clients: Tradescant's investment of care inspires as much wonder as the curiosities themselves (34).
Desiring his own 'Cabinet of Wonder' to house his burgeoning collection, Greyson commissioned the Canadian architect, Johnson Chou, to create cabinet of curiosities for the twenty-first century - 'except that the cabinet is to be a wonder in itself- as mysterious and intriguing as the objects it would display; an object that would "shimmer"'.
Cabinets of Curiosities were a personal collection that told a rich and colorful story of a person's travels, interests, and beliefs.
Especially in an elementary classroom, where the children's curiosities far exceed their capabilities, failure is inevitable.
He describes diversive (attraction to everything novel) and empathic (curiosity about the thoughts and feelings of other people) curiosity and explains how to develop these curiosities, as well as why they are essential to true learning.