cure

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an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure

Working to stop something from happening is easier and better than having to try to resolve it later. Unless you want to be violently ill for days, get the flu shot now—an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, you know. Councilor, I am of the firm belief that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, and investing in social and educational programs has been proven more effective at reducing crime than simply strengthening police force to combat it!

cure (someone or something) of (something)

1. To heal someone of something. That antibiotic cured Sam of his illness in just a few days. I really hope this new therapist can cure me of my compulsive behaviors.
2. To fix or repair a malfunctioning machine. Unfortunately, a few good smacks on the lid did not cure the washer of that dreadful noise.
See also: cure, of

kill or cure

Said of something that can only have one of two outcomes: very negative ("kill") or very positive ("cure"). We're all anxiously awaiting the dean's decision on grant money, as it will kill or cure our research.
See also: cure, kill

past cure

Incurable or hopeless, especially of an illness that has a grim prognosis. We need to go see your grandmother tonight—the doctors believe that her condition is past cure.
See also: cure, past

prevention is better than cure

Work to stop something from happening is easier and better than having to try to resolve it later. Unless you want to be violently ill for days, get the flu shot now—prevention is better than cure, you know.
See also: better, cure, prevention

sure cure

Something that is guaranteed to be an effective remedy for some ailment. Typically implies a treatment that is either figurative, alternative, or homemade. Here, drink this—it's a sure cure for a hangover. Arts and crafts projects are a sure cure for bored kids.
See also: cure, sure

take the cure

To enter into a center or program designed to treat drug or alcohol addiction. I always seem to find my way back to heroin a month or two after taking the cure. My brother had to hit absolute rock bottom before he would agree to take the cure.
See also: cure, take

the Dutch cure

The act of committing suicide when considered the cowardly response for one's ailment or woes. The disparaging use of the word "Dutch" is a reference to the fierce rivalry between England and the Dutch in the 17th century. After her daughter died, we were worried that Mary might be tempted to relieve her grief with the Dutch cure. I always told myself that if I were ever diagnosed with a terminal disease, I'd take the Dutch cure to end it all before life became too miserable.
See also: cure, Dutch

what can't be cured must be endured

One must simply learn to live with that which one is not able to resolve or improve. A: "I'm just really sick of working in this job, but there are just no other suitable job prospects in this part of the country." B: "Well, then, it sounds like you need to just suck it up. What can't be cured must be endured."
See also: cure, endure, must, what

cure someone of something

to rid someone of a disease, ailment, bad habit, or obsession. I hope that the doctor prescribes something to cure him of that chronic cough. Will you please try to cure yourself of your constant interrupting?
See also: cure, of

cure something of something

to eliminate the cause of a malfunction in a machine or a device. (See also cure someone of something.) I think I have cured the stapler of jamming all the time. I can't seem to cure the committee of procrastination.
See also: cure, of

ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure

Prov. If you put in a little effort to prevent a problem, you will not have to put in a lot of effort to solve the problem. Brush your teeth every day; that way you won't have to go to the dentist to have cavities filled. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. If you get in the habit of being careful with your new stereo, chances are you won't break it and have to have it fixed later. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Prevention is better than cure.

Prov. It is better to try to keep a bad thing from happening than it is to fix the bad thing once it has happened. (See also An ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure.) If we spend more money on education, so that children learn to be responsible citizens, we won't have to spend so much money on prisons. Prevention is better than cure.
See also: better, cure, prevention

take the cure

to enter into any treatment program or treatment center. (Especially those dealing with drugs and alcohol.) I wanted to take the cure, but I just couldn't bring myself to do it. It's hard to get those addicted to realize that they are the ones who have to decide to take the cure.
See also: cure, take

What can't be cured must be endured.

Prov. If you cannot do anything about a problem, you will have to live with it. Alan: No matter what I do, I can't make the dog stop barking in the middle of the night. Jane: What can't be cured must be endured, then, I guess.
See also: cure, endure, must, what

kill or cure

Either remedy a disease or kill the patient, as in The copy chief did not like her headline for the drug, "Kill or Cure." This expression dates from the mid-1700s, when it was already being used half-jokingly.
See also: cure, kill

ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, an

It is easier to forestall a disaster than to deal with it. For example, The new law makes all children under twelve wear bicycle helmets-an ounce of prevention. This ancient proverb is first recorded in Latin in Henry de Bracton's De Legibus (c. 1240) and has been repeated ever since, often in shortened form.
See also: of, ounce, pound, prevention, worth

sure cure

A remedy that won't fail, as in Hard work is a sure cure for brooding. Originating in the late 1800s as an advertising slogan ( Dr. Keck's Sure Cure for Catarrh; first recorded in 1881), this rhyming phrase was soon extended to other matters.
See also: cure, sure

kill or cure

(of a remedy for a problem) likely to either work well or fail catastrophically, with no possibility of partial success. British
1998 Richard Gordon Ailments through the Ages Mackenzie complained that the Germans' policy was ‘kill or cure’: if they tried an elaborate laryngectomy, it would turn them from surgeons into assassins.
See also: cure, kill

ˌkill or ˈcure

(British English) extreme action which will either be a complete success or a complete failure: This new chemical will either clean the painting perfectly or it will damage it badly. It’s kill or cure.
See also: cure, kill

preˌvention is better than ˈcure

(British English) (American English an ounce of preˌvention is better than a pound of ˈcure) (saying) it is better to stop something bad from happening rather than try to deal with the problems after it has happened: Remember that prevention is better than cure, so brush your teeth at least twice a day and visit your dentist for regular check-ups.
See also: better, cure, prevention

the Dutch act

and the Dutch cure
n. suicide. Well, Ken took the Dutch cure last week. So sad. It was the Dutch act. He ate his gun.
See also: act, Dutch

the Dutch cure

verb
See also: cure, Dutch

take the cure

tv. to enter into any treatment program or treatment center. (Especially those dealing with drugs and alcohol.) I wanted to take the cure, but I just couldn’t bring myself to do it.
See also: cure, take
References in periodicals archive ?
Distance and time effect on shear bond strength of brackets cured with a second-generation light-emitting diode unit.
Restated, the relationship between [T.sub.g] and PVPh content for the cured DGEBA epoxy/DDS appears to be quadratic with a maximum.
This is a common molding defect, caused by the expansion of the cured rubber on opening the mold, resulting in a rupture or tearing at the part line.
No light scattering pattern was obtained for cured pure UPE/styrene resin (Fig.
Compounds were molded and cured under pressure (~10 MPa) at 142[degrees]C to various states of cure by varying cure times, starting from 30 minutes to 70 minutes with an interval of 10 minutes.
When the narrower layer is cured, a step is formed between the edge of the previous layer and the top edge of the new layer.
* Vapor-cured--Vapor-cured systems (gas cured and coldbox) are those that mix resin on sand grains and blow the mixture into a corebox.
These material are usually molded in a closed system (with or without pressure) and may be cured at room or elevated temperatures.
A part is considered adequately cured when no more bubbles are present.
In addition to carbon, oxygen and hydrogen, these cores contain small amounts of sulfur after they are cured. The binders have only one-third the sulfur content of the systems commonly used to produce ductile iron and steel castings, such as green sand and furan or phenolic nobake binders catalyzed with toluene sulfonic acid (TSA) or xylene sulfonic acid (XSA) catalysts.
In most coldbox processes, the sand is coated with a liquid resin which is then "cured" when exposed to a gas catalyst.
The products include Chemlok 8114 for bonding Vamac, bisphenol curing FKM, polyacrylates, ethylene acrylic and peroxide cured EPDM elastomers; Chemlok 8115 for bonding sulfur cured NBR and Vamac elastomers; Chemlok 8116 for bonding peroxide curing compounds such as silicone, EPDM, FKM and HNBR elastomers; and Chemlok 8117 for bonding peroxide curing compounds such as silicones, EPDM, FKM and HNBR, as well as bisphenol compounds and Vamac elastomers.
The French aerospace company Aerospatiale has EB cured rocket-booster casings up to 12 ft diam.