cure

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past cure

Incurable or hopeless, especially of an illness that has a grim prognosis. We need to go see your grandmother tonight—the doctors believe that her condition is past cure.
See also: cure, past

cure (someone or something) of (something)

1. To heal someone of something. That antibiotic cured Sam of his illness in just a few days. I really hope this new therapist can cure me of my compulsive behaviors.
2. To fix or repair a malfunctioning machine. Unfortunately, a few good smacks on the lid did not cure the washer of that dreadful noise.
See also: cure, of

prevention is better than cure

One should work to stop something from happening rather than try to combat it later. Unless you want to be violently ill for days, get the flu shot now—prevention is better than cure, you know.
See also: better, cure, prevention

kill or cure

Said of something that can only have one of two outcomes: very negative ("kill") or very positive ("cure"). We're all anxiously awaiting the dean's decision on grant money, as it will kill or cure our research.
See also: cure, kill

cure someone of something

to rid someone of a disease, ailment, bad habit, or obsession. I hope that the doctor prescribes something to cure him of that chronic cough. Will you please try to cure yourself of your constant interrupting?
See also: cure, of

cure something of something

to eliminate the cause of a malfunction in a machine or a device. (See also cure someone of something.) I think I have cured the stapler of jamming all the time. I can't seem to cure the committee of procrastination.
See also: cure, of

ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure

Prov. If you put in a little effort to prevent a problem, you will not have to put in a lot of effort to solve the problem. Brush your teeth every day; that way you won't have to go to the dentist to have cavities filled. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. If you get in the habit of being careful with your new stereo, chances are you won't break it and have to have it fixed later. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Prevention is better than cure.

Prov. It is better to try to keep a bad thing from happening than it is to fix the bad thing once it has happened. (See also An ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure.) If we spend more money on education, so that children learn to be responsible citizens, we won't have to spend so much money on prisons. Prevention is better than cure.
See also: better, cure, prevention

take the cure

to enter into any treatment program or treatment center. (Especially those dealing with drugs and alcohol.) I wanted to take the cure, but I just couldn't bring myself to do it. It's hard to get those addicted to realize that they are the ones who have to decide to take the cure.
See also: cure, take

What can't be cured must be endured.

Prov. If you cannot do anything about a problem, you will have to live with it. Alan: No matter what I do, I can't make the dog stop barking in the middle of the night. Jane: What can't be cured must be endured, then, I guess.
See also: cure, endure, must, what

kill or cure

Either remedy a disease or kill the patient, as in The copy chief did not like her headline for the drug, "Kill or Cure." This expression dates from the mid-1700s, when it was already being used half-jokingly.
See also: cure, kill

ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, an

It is easier to forestall a disaster than to deal with it. For example, The new law makes all children under twelve wear bicycle helmets-an ounce of prevention. This ancient proverb is first recorded in Latin in Henry de Bracton's De Legibus (c. 1240) and has been repeated ever since, often in shortened form.
See also: of, ounce, pound, prevention, worth

sure cure

A remedy that won't fail, as in Hard work is a sure cure for brooding. Originating in the late 1800s as an advertising slogan ( Dr. Keck's Sure Cure for Catarrh; first recorded in 1881), this rhyming phrase was soon extended to other matters.
See also: cure, sure

kill or cure

(of a remedy for a problem) likely to either work well or fail catastrophically, with no possibility of partial success. British
1998 Richard Gordon Ailments through the Ages Mackenzie complained that the Germans' policy was ‘kill or cure’: if they tried an elaborate laryngectomy, it would turn them from surgeons into assassins.
See also: cure, kill

ˌkill or ˈcure

(British English) extreme action which will either be a complete success or a complete failure: This new chemical will either clean the painting perfectly or it will damage it badly. It’s kill or cure.
See also: cure, kill

preˌvention is better than ˈcure

(British English) (American English an ounce of preˌvention is better than a pound of ˈcure) (saying) it is better to stop something bad from happening rather than try to deal with the problems after it has happened: Remember that prevention is better than cure, so brush your teeth at least twice a day and visit your dentist for regular check-ups.
See also: better, cure, prevention

the Dutch act

and the Dutch cure
n. suicide. Well, Ken took the Dutch cure last week. So sad. It was the Dutch act. He ate his gun.
See also: act, Dutch

the Dutch cure

verb
See also: cure, Dutch

take the cure

tv. to enter into any treatment program or treatment center. (Especially those dealing with drugs and alcohol.) I wanted to take the cure, but I just couldn’t bring myself to do it.
See also: cure, take
References in periodicals archive ?
Pawlowski, "Application of the rubber process analyzer in characterizing the effects of silica on uncured and cured compound properties," ITEC '96 Select (by Rubber and Plastics News), September 1997.
height, so once the mold is cured, it is put into a room temperature nobake sand mold that contains the standard gating, sprees and runners.
DDSA (dodecenyl succinic anhydride) for producing tougher, more flexible cured polymers.
The "green" cores are then cured in a hot, forced air oven at 400-500F, up to 1 1/2 hr for a typical core.
Compared with a system cured with Ciba-Geigy Hardener HT-9664 (also based on DDS), the new diamine cured at 300 F instead of 350 F and gave good green strength after curing at only 250 F, plus improved strength and modulus (dry or water-conditioned, cool or hot) and decreased water absorption.
Cured materials are said to exhibit high deflection temperatures, excellent chemical resistance, and good retention of mechanical properties at elevated temperatures.
They developed reversible epoxies cured with crosslinking agents that contain disulfide bonds, such as dithiodianiline (DTDA).
Pawlowski, "Application of the rubber process analyzer in characterizing the effects of silica an uncured and cured compound properties (with H.
Cured properties range from hard, high Tg (275 C) materials to flexible rubber-like materials.
Williams, said that he expects that the StarCure(TM) processed tobacco which will be received from participating farmers at the Company's newly expanded Chase City processing center, will be cured using the Company's proprietary process that results in tobacco having very low levels of cancer-causing tobacco specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), measured in parts per billion.
Liquid silicone rubber (LSR) and platinum cured room temperature vulcanization (RTV) products are offered in off-the-shelf and custom formulated solutions for numerous applications.
Test panels were cured in the mold at 437 F for 2 hr and then post-cured free-standing for 2 hr at 482 F.
Powell Manufacturing of Bennettsville, SC the exclusive manufacturer of the StarCure(TM) tobacco-curing barn announced today it will not offer heat exchanger conversion kits for direct-fired flue cured tobacco barns.
R-2634 is an electrically conductive, room temperature vulcanized (RTV) paste that maintains electrical conductivity from -115 [degrees] C to 230 [degrees] C (-178 [degrees] F to 445 [degrees] F) when fully cured.