cue

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(right) on cue

At exactly the most (or least) opportune moment, as if on purpose. We had just been talking about the awful new company initiative when, on cue, the CEO walked into the room. I was complaining to my wife that none of my friends had asked how our recent move when, when one of them sent me a text message about it right on cue.
See also: cue, on

cue in

1. To signal one to begin to do something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cue" and "in." And then I'll cue in the sopranos for the harmony. Once the director cued me in, I stepped on stage.
2. To give one information that they have missed. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cue" and "in." Don't worry, I was here from the beginning so I'll cue you in on what we talked about.
See also: cue

jump the queue

To go ahead of someone or multiple people who have been waiting before one. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I wanted to shout at the man for jumping the queue, but I was too embarrassed about making a scene. There has been public outrage after it came to light that some people had been jumping the queue for surgery appointments because they had a friend or relative working at the hospital.
See also: jump, queue

take a/(one's) cue from (someone or something)

To model one's actions based on the example or influence of someone or something else. The director definitely took a cue from his favorite film when framing that scene. Take a cue from your kids and learn how to enjoy the little things.
See also: cue, take

cue up

1. To prepare something for viewing or listening. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cue" and "up." You cue up the video, I'll get the popcorn.
2. To assemble into a line, as of people who are waiting for something. A variant spelling of "queue up." I can't believe people are cued up already—the store doesn't open for another 12 hours!
See also: cue, up

cue someone in

 
1. Lit. to give someone a cue; to indicate to someone that the time has come. Now, cue the orchestra director in. All right, cue in the announcer.
2. Fig. to tell someone what is going on. (Almost the same as clue someone in (on something).) I want to know what's going on. Cue me in. Cue in the general about the troop movement.
See also: cue

take one's cue from someone

to use someone else's behavior or reactions as a guide to one's own. (From the theatrical cue as a signal to speak, etc.) If you don't know which spoons to use at the dinner, just take your cue from John. The other children took their cue from Tommy and ignored the new boy.
See also: cue, take

cue in

Give information or instructions, for example, She said she'd cue us in on their summer plans. This verbal use of the noun cue in the sense of "guiding suggestion" dates from the 1920s.
See also: cue

take one's cue from

Follow the lead of another, as in I'm not sure what to bring, so I'll take my cue from you. This expression, first recorded in 1622, alludes to the cue giving an actor a signal to speak.
See also: cue, take

take your cue from someone

COMMON If you take your cue from someone, you behave in the same way as them. Taking his cue from his companion, he apologized for his earlier display of temper. Everybody working for you will take their cue from you.
See also: cue, someone, take

on cue

at the correct moment.
See also: cue, on

take your cue from

follow the example or advice of.
Cue in both of these idioms is used in the theatrical sense of ‘the word or words that signal when another actor should speak or perform a particular action’.
See also: cue, take

jump the queue

1 push into a queue of people in order to be served or dealt with before your turn. 2 take unfair precedence over others.
The US version of this expression is jump in line .
See also: jump, queue

(right) on ˈcue

just at the appropriate moment: The bell sounded for the beginning of the lesson, and, right on cue, the teacher walked in.
See also: cue, on

take your ˈcue from somebody

be influenced in your actions by what somebody else has done: In designing the car, we took our cue from other designers who aimed to combine low cost with low petrol consumption.
See also: cue, somebody, take

jump the ˈqueue

(British English) (American English jump the ˈline, cut in ˈline) go to the front of a line of people without waiting for your turn: I get very angry with people who jump the queue. ▶ ˈqueue-jumping (British English) (American English ˈline-jumping less frequent) noun: This practice encourages queue-jumping for medical services.
See also: jump, queue

cue in

v.
1. To give a signal to someone at a specified time, especially a signal to begin: The conductor cued in each section of the choir one by one. Cue me in when it's time to say my lines.
2. To give information or instructions to someone, such as a latecomer: I cued in my coworker about the items that we discussed at the beginning of the meeting. She cued me in to what happened in the first five minutes of the movie.
See also: cue

cue up

v.
1. To position an audio or video recording in readiness for playing: The DJ cued up the next record on the turntable as the song came to an end. I wanted to show scenes from the film during my presentation, so I cued them up ahead of time.
2. To form or get into a waiting line; queue up: The customers cued up for tickets long before the box office was open.
See also: cue, up
References in periodicals archive ?
CUES intended to deceive BVS to enable CUES to obtain an immediate revenue stream without investing funds," it claimed.
According to BVS, CUES selected the company as its new online training partner in 2011, and BVS agreed to pay a royalty or commission for new business and renewals.
Sarah may use other cues for some of the same behaviors with other dogs.
Pigeon 304 finished 22, 14, 22, 16 and ten trials in the five consecutive Reversed Cues sessions, respectively--an indication that responding may have been undergoing extinction in the presence of the reversed cues.
Trials were blocked with respect to each of two cue conditions (cue and no cue) and two target-probe SOA conditions (0 and 2000 msec).
The effect of the physical characteristics of cues and targets on facilitation and inhibition.
In our study, we investigated whether or not the impact of implementation intentions on reactions to alternative cues would be moderated by ambiguity between focal and alternative cues.
While conversing with the participants, Nexi - operated remotely by researchers - either expressed cues that were considered less than trustworthy or expressed similar, but non-trust-related cues.
In this study, we investigated the behavior of southern oyster drills as they moved upstream toward chemical cues derived from live, fouled oysters taken directly from the field.
Gaze cues are composed of the orientations of the eyes, head, and body and communicate the direction of attention (Frischen, Bayliss, and Tipper 2007).
The researchers studied whether it would also aid in reducing brain and craving responses when smokers are exposed to smoking cues.
This result is consistent with our proposal that, for some individuals, alcohol cues may trigger "flashbacks" (e.
In the present experiment exogenous cues were provided to attract visual attention to several body parts of the oncoming attacker.
A traditional cue reactivity laboratory study of cannabis-dependent adolescent inpatients supports the role of chronic cannabis cues in increasing craving (Lundahl, Borden & Lukas 2001).
Cues are all-important, and the authors devote much space to them.