cue in


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cue in

1. To signal one to begin to do something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cue" and "in." And then I'll cue in the sopranos for the harmony. Once the director cued me in, I stepped on stage.
2. To give one information that they have missed. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cue" and "in." Don't worry, I was here from the beginning so I'll cue you in on what we talked about.
See also: cue

cue someone in

 
1. Lit. to give someone a cue; to indicate to someone that the time has come. Now, cue the orchestra director in. All right, cue in the announcer.
2. Fig. to tell someone what is going on. (Almost the same as clue someone in (on something).) I want to know what's going on. Cue me in. Cue in the general about the troop movement.
See also: cue

cue in

Give information or instructions, for example, She said she'd cue us in on their summer plans. This verbal use of the noun cue in the sense of "guiding suggestion" dates from the 1920s.
See also: cue

cue in

v.
1. To give a signal to someone at a specified time, especially a signal to begin: The conductor cued in each section of the choir one by one. Cue me in when it's time to say my lines.
2. To give information or instructions to someone, such as a latecomer: I cued in my coworker about the items that we discussed at the beginning of the meeting. She cued me in to what happened in the first five minutes of the movie.
See also: cue
References in periodicals archive ?
(1998) designed a 2-D exocentric visual cue in the form of an arrow always presented in the participants' line of sight.
Most of these were single-judge, nonprecedential decisions holding that VA did not commit CUE in denying benefits.
Hanging tin cans or wind chimes on the irrigation pump works well to create a sound cue in the middle of a field, where using a radio is not practical.
To make sense of the chemical chatter that exists in a hive, they follow innate rules that let them cue in on one password over other odors, he explains.
I've seen dogs who can learn a new cue in as few as three or four clicks and others take longer.