cuckoo

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cloud-cuckoo land

A state or realm of unrealistic and idealized fancy, beyond the realms of possibility. Often preceded by "live/be in." He's always got some harebrained schemes on how to fix the world, all of them right out of cloud-cuckoo land! If Tom thinks he'll be able to live off his bad poetry, he's living in cloud-cuckoo land!
See also: land

be in cloud-cuckoo land

To believe in or be absorbed by unrealistic, idealized, and/or fanciful ideas that are beyond the realms of possibility. If Tom thinks he'll be able to live off his bad poetry, he's in cloud-cuckoo land!
See also: land

cuckoo in the nest

Someone in a group who is seen as different and ostracized by their peers. Since Sam always got good grades and never got in trouble, he was seen by his unruly peers as a cuckoo in the nest.
See also: cuckoo, nest

live in cloud-cuckoo land

To believe that unrealistic, idealized, and/or fanciful ideas will happen, when in fact they are beyond the realms of possibility. Tom thinks he'll be able to live off his bad poetry—he's living in cloud-cuckoo land if you ask me!
See also: land, live

cuckoo

Crazy. There's a guy on our corner who shouts about the end of the world; I think he's a little cuckoo.

cloud-cuckoo land

An idealized mythical domain, as in That idea about flying cars is straight out of cloud-cuckoo land. This expression originated as a translation from the Greek of Aristophanes' play The Birds, where it signifies the realm built by the birds to separate the gods from humankind. It came into use in the 1820s. During the 19th century it began to be used for a place of wildly fanciful dreams, unrealistic expectations, or the like, and it also acquired the connotation of "crazy" (from cuckoo, slang for "crazy" since about 1900). Also see la-la land; never-never land.
See also: land

cuckoo in the nest

an unwelcome intruder in a place or situation.
The female cuckoo often lays its eggs in other birds' nests. Once hatched, the cuckoo fledgling pushes the other birds' fledglings out of the nest.
See also: cuckoo, nest

coo-coo

and cuckoo
1. mod. unconscious. I socked him on the snoot and knocked him coo-coo.
2. mod. insane. How did I ever get involved in this cuckoo scheme, anyway?

cuckoo

verb

Cloud Cuckoo Land

A nonexistent place of perfection, a utopia. This phrase comes from The Birds by the Greek dramatist Aristophanes, in which the birds decide to build a perfect city called Cloud Cuckoo City. Over the years “City” became “Land.”
See also: cloud, cuckoo, land
References in periodicals archive ?
Experts expected the cuckoos to start their journeys towards the end of August, but the first bird left in the first week of June, and two others flocked close behind.
TAGGED: With the numbers of cuckoos rapidly declining in this country, ornithologists wired up five birds to provide an online blog about what happens to them when they leave these shores ROUTEFINDER: As data was received the ornithologists were able to plot the courses taken by the cuckoos via satellite
Cuckoos are well-studied in the UK and no explanation of the fall in numbers can be found based on what happens here.
External differences between newly hatched cuckoos (Coceyzus americanus and C.
Louise Pedersen, from the RSPB in the West Midlands, said: "The cuckoo's iconic song was once a common sound over much of the region, heralding summer and the return of warmer weather.
Typically, these Canadian cuckoos build flimsy nests of twigs and grasses in a small bush or tree, where they incubate their eggs and raise their young.
The Cuckoo Clock Museum in Knutsford, Cheshire, has more than 600 of the traditional Black Forest clocks and they take hours to reset.
Each female cuckoo will lay up to 30 eggs during the course of a summer - all in the nests of a smaller bird.
It is Spring and the voices of the cuckoos are calling.
An international research group has found that genes affecting the egg type of the common cuckoo, which is known for invading other birds' nests and laying eggs that match the host's eggs, are located in the female-specific chromosome.
The common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) has long intrigued poets and philosophers as a study in contradictions.(1) Myth and biological reality merge and diverge, forging cuckoo lore that is intriguing, mystifying, and powerful.
One of the dangers of romantic love, according to the cuckoo in Sir John Clanvowe's The Cuckoo and the Nightingale, or The Boke of Cupide,(1) is that of being abandoned:
These observations strongly suggest that cuckoos punish hosts that remove cuckoo eggs from their nests, Soler wrote in a subsequent paper co-authored by University of Granada ecologists Juan Soler and Juan Martinez, and Anders Mol- ler, an evolutionary biologist at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris.
For this enforcement hypothesis to work, parasitic cuckoos must revisit parasitized nests and, if they find that their offspring are not in the nest, destroy or prey upon host eggs or nestlings.
We do regularly see cuckoos on the Cleveland coast, but usually in early spring and summer when they are arriving or leaving.