cry one's eyes out, to

cry one's eyes out

Also, cry one's heart out. Weep inconsolably. For example, Wendy was so homesick that she was crying her eyes out, or At funerals Ruth always cries her heart out. [c. 1700]
See also: cry, eye, out

cry one's eyes out, to

To weep or mourn excessively. This hyperbole— how could weeping actually cause eyes to fall out?—dates back at least to the early eighteenth century. It appears in Colley Cibber’s 1705 play, The Careless Husband (1.1), “I could cry my eyes out,” and also in Jonathan Swift’s Polite Conversation (1738). In the nineteenth century it was sometimes altered to crying one’s heart out, especially in popular romantic novels such as Margaret Oliphant’s Joyce (1888).
See also: cry, eye