cry havoc


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cry havoc

To sound a warning or alarm of impending chaos, danger, or disaster. "Havoc" was originally a military order in the Middle Ages for soldiers to pillage and cause destruction; it features most famously in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar: "Cry 'Havoc,' and let slip the dogs of war." The governor cried havoc as the protest became increasingly violent. With the hurricane approaching the city, officials cried havoc and urged citizens to seek shelter.
See also: cry, havoc

cry havoc

Sound an alarm or warning, as in In his sermon the pastor cried havoc to the congregation's biases against gays. The noun havoc was once a command for invaders to begin looting and killing the defenders' town. Shakespeare so used it in Julius Caesar (3:1): "Cry 'Havoc' and let slip the dogs of war." By the 19th century the phrase had acquired its present meaning.
See also: cry, havoc

cry havoc

To sound an alarm; warn.
See also: cry, havoc
References in periodicals archive ?
As the components I chose were not on the approved list from Cry Havoc, I found that the supplied gas tube was perhaps l/8th inch too long to allow the barrel to mate with the receiver.
Lankford's recent work entitled Cry Havoc! The Crooked Road to the Civil War, 1861.
Cry Havoc is a suspenseful novel about an impending oil crises that threatens to derail the free world.
Bella Books congratulates Baxter Clare on the Lambda Literary Award nomination of her book Cry Havoc, the latest in the critically acclaimed Detective Franco series.
Adams' immediate build-up to the opening game has included reading Henry V, the apt story of a patriotic leader who overcomes a troubled youth to fulfil his destiny at the battle of Agincourt amid the call to "cry havoc and let slip the dogs of war".
Workshop attendees are reassured that they won't have to learn reams of text, nor will they be leaping on desks urging underlings to "cry havoc and let loose the dogs of war".
To misquote William Shakespeare, "Cry havoc! And let loose the dogs of war!
Equally fitting was the resonant quote from Shakespeare in Laughing Lions: the phrase "Cry havoc," which should be completed, as in Julius Caesar, "let slip the dogs of war."
Unable to see themselves as members of a national collectivity, the product of one polity larger than a tribe, together they cry havoc and together they rend the others' flesh.
(SKY MOVIES SCIFI/ HORROR) 4.45pm Cry Havoc. (PG) (1943) (b&w) Second World War drama, starring Margaret Sullavan.