crust

(redirected from crustless)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

earn a crust

To do work of any kind for a living; to earn money by some means. No, working in a canning factory isn't exactly glamorous, but we've all got to earn a crust somehow.
See also: crust, earn

earn (one's) crust

To do work of any kind for a living; to earn money by some means. No, working in a canning factory isn't exactly glamorous, but I've got to earn my crust somehow. I hear Janet is earning her crust with an investment firm in Tokyo now.
See also: crust, earn

the upper crust

The most affluent, powerful, or influential class in a society; the social elites or aristocrats. The awards ceremony was a chance for me to mingle with the upper crust. For years, tax laws have been specifically designed to favor the upper crust before the working or lower class.
See also: crust, upper

promises are like pie crust(s): (easily made,) easily broken

Promises are as thin and fragile as pie crust, and people make them so often but are rarely inclined to keep them. "Pie crust" is often written as a single word. A: "He promised to help me study for my exam, but he didn't show up!" B: "Well, promises are like pie crusts, Sarah—easily made, easily broken." A: "I promise that I will never do something like that again." B: "Not good enough, Tom. Promises are like piecrust—easily broken."
See also: broken, easily, like, pie, promise

promises are like pie crust(s): (they are) made to be broken

Promises are as thin and fragile as pie crust, and people make them so often but are rarely inclined to keep them. "Pie crust" is often written as a single word. A: "He promised to help me study for my exam, but he didn't show up!" B: "Well, promises are like pie crusts, Sarah—made to be broken." A: "I promise that I will never do something like that again." B: "Not good enough, Tom. Promises are like piecrust—they're made to be broken."
See also: broken, like, made, pie, promise

upper crust

Fig. the higher levels of society; the upper class. (From the top, as opposed to the bottom, crust of a pie.) Jane speaks like that because she pretends to be from the upper crust, but her father was a miner. James is from the upper crust, but he is penniless.
See also: crust, upper

upper crust

The highest social class, as in She wanted badly to be one of the upper crust but it wasn't going to happen. This term alludes to the choicest part of a pie or loaf of bread. [First half of 1800s]
See also: crust, upper

earn a crust

or

earn your crust

BRITISH
If you earn a crust or earn your crust, you earn enough money to live on, especially by doing work you would prefer not to do. In his early days, he would do almost anything to earn a crust. You have to earn your crust somehow. Note: A crust means a piece of bread, especially a piece of the hard, outer part of the loaf.
See also: crust, earn

the upper crust

The upper crust are the people who belong to the highest social class. The Cowes Regatta is a gathering of the wealthy and the upper crust who race their huge yachts and attend grand parties.
See also: crust, upper

the upper crust

the aristocracy and upper classes. informal
In Anne Elizabeth Baker 's Glossary of Northamptonshire Words and Phrases ( 1854 ) ‘Mrs Upper Crust’ is explained as the nickname for ‘any female who assumes unauthorized superiority’. The term was also current in informal American speech in the mid 19th century. The French word gratin has a similar pair of literal and metaphorical senses, being literally ‘a crust of crumbs and cheese on top of a cooked dish’ and metaphorically ‘the highest class of society’.
See also: crust, upper

ˌearn a/your ˈcrust

(British English, informal) earn enough money to live on: He’s a musician now, but he used to earn a crust by cleaning windows.
The crust is the hard, outer surface of bread.
See also: crust, earn

the ˌupper ˈcrust

(informal) people who are in the highest social classIn the past, the top or upper crust of a loaf of bread was the best part, which the more important members of the household ate.
See also: crust, upper

crust

n. nerve; gall. She’s got a lot of crust—coming in here like that.

upper crust, the

An older name for high society. This term appears to have been coined by Thomas Haliburton in his Sam Slick tales. “It was none of your skim-milk parties, but superfine uppercrust,” he wrote (The Clockmaker, 1835). By 1850 others were using the term, which alluded to the choicest part of a pie or loaf of bread. “Those families, you know, are our upper crust, not upper ten thousand” wrote James Fenimore Cooper (Ways of the Hour, 1850). The term is heard less often nowadays but is not quite obsolete.
See also: upper

upper crust

The top level of society. Although you might think that “crust” refers to bread and that the upper part was reserved for the aristocracy, word detectives would say you're wrong: no authoritative written connection between bread and the well-bred can be found. “Crust” refers to the earth's crust, or top layer. The upper crust of a society is its top layer.
See also: crust, upper
References in periodicals archive ?
Patent 6,004,596 for a Crustless Peanut Butter Sandwich claims (in summary), "A sealed crustless sandwich consisting [of] a bread layer .
Bad patents are everywhere: covering obvious inventions like the crustless peanut butter and jelly sandwich, ridiculous ideas like a method of exercising a cat with a laser pointer, and impossible concepts like traveling faster than the speed of light.
CRUSTLESS HAM AND GRITS PIE 1/3 cup quick grits 1 cup water 1 cup evaporated milk 3/4 cup Cheddar cheese, shredded 3/4 cup lean ham, cooked and chopped 3 eggs, beaten 1 tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce 1/4 teaspoon salt Cook grits in water according to package directions, omitting salt.
They have been eating plenty of calorie-packed cheese omelets, fried chicken and crustless quiche.
By the Victorian era, tea time was a fashionable custom, as ladies and gentlemen gathered to enjoy a pretty pot of hot tea, finger sandwiches made with wafer-thin, crustless slices of bread, warm scones with butter, rich Devonshire cream and strawberry jam, and hot tea cakes served on fine china.
For the more sedentary, there are computer lessons, a two-room professionally staffed library, casino, a formal afternoon tea with silver trays of crustless sandwiches and creamy scones, and that laidback outdoor deck-chair activity of sipping hot bouillion enveloped in a woolen blanket.
Less than a year after announcing the deal, Sara Lee had launched Ironkids Crustless Bread and expanded its flagship brand into the fresh bread aisle with one of the category's biggest rollouts ever.
a Michigan company, was infringing on its patent by serving crustless peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches, and demanded that it cease and desist immediately.
PTO awarded a patent to Menusaver for crustless peanut butter-and-jelly sandwiches in December 1999.
And what cooler substance could you find than cucumber, chilled, skinned and cut into slices and used to fill soft, crustless white bread?
If tradition is truly handed down from one generation to the next, at this moment I would be warm, indoors, nibbling little egg-and-olive crustless sandwiches, singing "Auld Lang Syne" with Guy Lombardo on the TV, and toasting the New Year with ginger ale, as if I were eight years old again.
2oz (60g) crustless granary bread, made into fresh crumbs
Chilled Gewurztraminer, Dover sole, mange-tour, buttered soft damp crustless bread.
With, I think, Lee Harvey Oswald's Mannlicher, I do not mean a Mannlicher but the Mannlicher, which I found under my chair, though I really noticed it only once I had it across my knees and saw that it was Lee's, I thought of shooting the Emerald City cossack for a tuna sandwich, crustless and about one inch by one inch and soft.