crushed


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crush (someone or something) (in)to (something)

To pulverize or break something into a certain condition or state. I crushed the cookies into crumbs and added them to the icing. The fallen tree branch crushed the car's windshield to pieces.
See also: crush

crush (up) against (someone or something)

To have a heavy physical impact on someone or something. Molly had to go to the hospital after the door in the lobby crushed up against her hand. The singer's screaming fans crushed against the fence in front of the stage.
See also: crush

crush down

1. To physically push someone or something down; to flatten someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "crush" and "down." If you just crush down these clothes, I think you'd be able to fit more in your suitcase.
2. To suppress or subdue someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "crush" and "down." The boss is always quick to crush down any dissent in our department.
See also: crush, down

crush in

To push something inward. A noun or pronoun can be used between "crush" and "in." The fallen tree branch crushed in the roof of my car, hence the huge dent where it landed.
See also: crush

crush it

To succeed at something in a particularly impressive way. Often used in the past tense. Her presentation for the CEO went really well. She totally crushed it! That band always crushes it, so I'm not surprised their halftime performance was spectacular.
See also: crush

crush out

1. To squeeze something out (of something else). A noun or pronoun can be used between "crush" and "out." This hat is too tight—it's crushing my brains out! This kind of juicer chews up the fruit and vegetables before crushing out their juice.
2. To extinguish something by crushing it, especially a cigarette. A noun or pronoun can be used between "crush" and "out." I took one last drag and crushed the cigarette out in the ashtray. The detective crushed out his cigarette angrily and stormed out of the room.
See also: crush, out

crush up

To pulverize or break something into a smaller state or finer substance. A noun or pronoun can be used between "crush" and "up." If I don't crush up the pill and mix it into my daughter's apple sauce, she won't take it.
See also: crush, up

crushed by

1. Physically flattened or injured by the weight or force of something. Molly had to go to the hospital after her hand was crushed by one of the doors in the lobby.
2. Saddened or discouraged by something. Henry was totally crushed by the news that he didn't get into his dream school.
See also: by, crushed

crush someone or something down

 
1. Lit. to press or force someone or something down. Crush the leaves down so you can put more into the basket. Crush down the leaves and fill the basket higher.
2. Fig. to suppress someone or something. The dictator crushed the opposition down ruthlessly. He crushed down all political opposition. The army crushed the peasants down ruthlessly.
See also: crush, down

crush something in

to force something inward; to break something in. The beam nearly crushed Jason's head in. He tried to crush in the door.
See also: crush

crush something up (into something)

to press or grind something with great force until it is reduced to something smaller. The chef crushed the almonds up into a powder and sprinkled them on the dessert. The machine crushed up all the glass into tiny bits.
See also: crush, up

crush something up (into something)

to press or grind something with great force until it is reduced to something smaller. The chef crushed the almonds up into a powder and sprinkled them on the dessert. The machine crushed up all the glass into tiny bits.
See also: crush, up

crushed by something

Fig. demoralized; having hurt feelings. The whole family was completely crushed by the news. I was just crushed by your attitude. I thought we were friends.
See also: by, crushed
References in periodicals archive ?
The crushed and broken stone mining and quarrying market consists of sales of crushed and broken stone by entities (organizations, sole traders and partnerships) that mine and quarry crushed and broken stone.
Nally & Gibson Georgetown Quarry Stone, crushed
"England is my second home and we are going to have to do a song about that crushed Ferrari now."
From the experiment and simulation results, we obtain the average particle size of the crushed material and calculate the crushing ratio.
Decreased bioavailability of a sustained-release formulation of theophylline, which is likely to reduce efficacy, was observed when it was crushed and administered via nasogastric tube.
Ten finalists will have to answer questions on air and if the last finalist answers the question correctly they will win the car but if they answer the question wrongly, the car will be crushed.
Before installing the new equipment, Scana separated sand from the castings via mechanical shakeout, after which the lumps of sand were crushed and sieved.
Alternative surfaces on accessible trails may include wood shavings, crushed shell or gravel, pine needles, crushed limestone or granite.
drum, positioned under the machine, stores the crushed filters as waste oil which is deposited into a drum or bulk tank by a drain located under the crushing chamber.
A study at the University of Wisconsin at Madison by soil scientist Richard Wolkowski, published in the January-February 2000 issue of Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis, found that clean scrap gypsum wallboard can be crushed and applied to alfalfa as fertilizer.
Together with high volumetric capabilities and high power, the crushed product is also much finer.
Sustained-release and enteric-coated medications should not be crushed. A sustained-release medication contains small particles of a drug coated with materials requiring varying amounts of time to dissolve.
crushed garlic 1/2 cup chopped onion 1/2 cup chopped zucchini 1/4 cup chopped sweet red
Sweeting, it suggests a possible answer to some vexing questions about why certain crystals emit light as they're crushed. Her newest research, reported last month in Toronto at the Third Chemical Congress of North America, not only explains the candy spectable but also indicates a possible general mechanism behind triboluminescene--a phenomenon first reported by Francis Bacon some 400 years ago.