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(as) hoarse as a crow

Speaking with a very raspy voice; very hoarse. Since I'm hoarse as a crow today, I'm not going to speak for much longer. I woke up hoarse as a crow after belting out my favorite songs all night long at the concert.
See also: crow, hoarse

a crow to pluck

An issue to discuss—typically one that is a source of annoyance for the speaker. Hey, I have a crow to pluck with you! Why didn't you put gas in my car after you borrowed it?
See also: crow, pluck, to

a whistling woman and a crowing hen are neither fit for God nor men

proverb It is not proper for a woman to engage in overtly masculine behavior. My grandmother is legitimately worried because I asked a boy to the dance, instead of him asking me. She says that a whistling woman and a crowing hen are neither fit for God nor men—whatever that means.
See also: and, crow, fit, for, god, hen, men, neither, nor, whistle, woman

as the crow flies

The measurement of distance in a straight line. (From the notion that crows always fly in a straight line.) From here to the office, it's about 20 miles as the crow flies, but it's more like 30 miles by car since you have to wind around the mountain.
See also: crow, flies

be up with the crows

To be awake, out of bed, and active at a particularly early hour of the morning. Primarily heard in Australia. I don't know how he does it, but my husband is up with the crows every single morning. I won't have another pint, thanks. I have to be up with the crows tomorrow, so I'd better head home soon.
See also: crow, up

crow about (something)

1. Literally, to squawk, as of a rooster. What is that rooster crowing about now? It's not even daylight yet!
2. By extension, to brag or boast about something. You know, no one likes it when you go around crowing about your successes in business.
See also: crow

crow bait

Someone or something that is near death, often an animal. That old horse can barely walk around the farm these days—he's just crow bait now.
See also: bait, crow

crow over (something)

To brag or boast about something, likened to the squawking of a rooster. You know, no one likes it when you go around crowing over your successes in business.
See also: crow, over

crow's feet

Wrinkles at the corner of the eyes, likened to the long forked toes on a crow's foot. Some people dread getting wrinkles, but I rather like my crow's feet—I think they give me a wise appearance.
See also: feet

eat crow

To admit that one is wrong, usually when doing so triggers great embarrassment or shame. Ugh, now that my idea has failed, I'll have to eat crow in the board meeting tomorrow. I think Ellen is a perfectionist because the thought of having to eat crow terrifies her.
See also: crow, eat

eat dirt

1. To be subject to insults and harsh treatment. Sometimes used as a hostile imperative. Because of all the bragging I'd done beforehand, my friends made me eat dirt for finishing last in the race. Eat dirt, Jimmy!
2. To retract, regret, or feel foolish about what one has previously said. You think I can't get an A in this class, but I'll make you eat dirt when we get our report cards! After my negative prediction for the season, I certainly ate dirt when the team started out undefeated.
See also: dirt, eat

eat humble pie

To admit that one is wrong, usually when doing so triggers great embarrassment or shame. Ugh, now that my idea has failed, I'll have to eat humble pie in the board meeting tomorrow. I think Ellen is a perfectionist because the thought of having to eat humble pie terrifies her.
See also: eat, humble, pie

Jim Crow

The systemic discrimination against African Americans that occurred in the southern United States from the end of the American Civil War until the 1960s, in which black people were treated as a lower class of citizens than white people. Back during Jim Crow, a black person couldn't even use the same drinking fountain as a white person! Many are calling this systemic racism the "new Jim Crow."
See also: crow, Jim

make (one) eat crow

To cause or force one to admit that one was wrong, especially regarding something about which one was overconfident or too self-assured. They laughed at the thought of our team every winning the championships, but we'll make them eat crow when we beat them for the title tomorrow! They made me eat crow when they showed me the sales numbers for the latest product.
See also: crow, eat, make

stone the crows

An exclamation of surprise. Well, stone the crows! I never thought I'd see him walk through those doors again.
See also: crow, stone

stone the crows!

An expression of shock or surprise at or about something. Primarily heard in UK. Well, stone the crows! I never thought I'd see you around these parts again! Stone the crows, the kids are actually playing together quietly for once!
See also: stone

the way the crow flies

The measurement of distance between two points in a straight line. (From the notion that a crow is able fly in a straight line, in contrast to the circuitous roads and paths we must usually traverse on the ground.) From here to the office, it's about 20 miles the way the crow flies, but it's more like 30 miles by car since you have to wind around these mountain roads.
See also: crow, flies, way

up with the crows

Awake, out of bed, and active at a particularly early hour of the morning. Primarily heard in Australia. I don't know how he does it, but my husband has gotten up with the crows every morning of his life. I won't have another pint, thanks. I have to be up with the crows tomorrow, so I'd better head home soon.
See also: crow, up

whistling girls and crowing hens always come to some bad end

proverb It is not proper for a woman to engage in overtly masculine behavior. My grandmother is legitimately worried because I asked a boy to the dance, instead of him asking me. She says that whistling girls and crowing hens soon come to some bad end—whatever that means.
See also: always, and, bad, come, crow, end, girl, hen, to, whistle
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

crow about something

 and crow over something 
1. Lit. [for a rooster] to cry out or squawk about something. The rooster was crowing about something—you never know what.
2. Fig. [for someone] to brag about something. Stop crowing about your successes! She is crowing over her new car.
See also: crow

crow bait

Rur. someone or an animal that is likely to die; a useless animal or person. That old dog used to hunt good, but now he's just crow bait.
See also: bait, crow

eat crow

 
1. . Fig. to display total humility, especially when shown to be wrong. Well, it looks like I was wrong, and I'm going to have to eat crow. I'll be eating crow if I'm not shown to be right.
2. Fig. to be shamed; to admit that one was wrong. When it became clear that they had arrested the wrong person, the police had to eat crow. Mary talked to Joe as if he was an uneducated idiot, till she found out he was a college professor. That made her eat crow.
See also: crow, eat

eat humble pie

to act very humble when one is shown to be wrong. I think I'm right, but if I'm wrong, I'll eat humble pie. You think you're so smart. I hope you have to eat humble pie.
See also: eat, humble, pie

*hoarse as a crow

very hoarse. (*Also: as ~.) After shouting at the team all afternoon, the coach was as hoarse as a crow. Jill: Has Bob got a cold? Jane: No, he's always hoarse as a crow.
See also: crow, hoarse

make someone eat crow

Fig. to cause someone to retract a statement or admit an error. Because Mary was completely wrong, we made her eat crow. They won't make me eat crow. They can't prove I was wrong.
See also: crow, eat, make
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

as the crow flies

In a straight line, by the shortest route, as in It's only a mile as the crow flies, but about three miles by this mountain road. This idiom is based on the fact that crows, very intelligent birds, fly straight to the nearest food supply. [Late 1700s]
See also: crow, flies

crow over

Exult loudly about, especially over someone's defeat. For example, In most sports it's considered bad manners to crow over your opponent. This term alludes to the cock's loud crow. [Late 1500s]
See also: crow, over

eat crow

Also, eat dirt or humble pie . Be forced to admit a humiliating mistake, as in When the reporter got the facts all wrong, his editor made him eat crow. The first term's origin has been lost, although a story relates that it involved a War of 1812 encounter in which a British officer made an American soldier eat part of a crow he had shot in British territory. Whether or not it is true, the fact remains that crow meat tastes terrible. The two variants originated in Britain. Dirt obviously tastes bad. And humble pie alludes to a pie made from umbles, a deer's undesirable innards (heart, liver, entrails). [Early 1800s] Also see eat one's words.
See also: crow, eat
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

as the crow flies

If one place is a particular distance from another as the crow flies, the two places are that distance apart if you measure them in a straight line. I live at Mesa, Washington, about 10 miles as the crow flies from Hanford. This mountainous area has always been remote, although it is not far from Tehran as the crow flies. Note: People used to think that crows always travelled to their destination by the most direct route possible. `Make a beeline' is based on a similar idea.
See also: crow, flies

eat crow

AMERICAN
If someone eats crow, they admit that they have been wrong and apologize. He wanted to make his critics eat crow. I didn't want to eat crow the rest of my life if my theories were wrong. Note: The usual British expression is eat humble pie.
See also: crow, eat

eat humble pie

If someone eats humble pie, they admit that they have been wrong and apologize. The Queen's Press secretary was forced to eat humble pie yesterday and publicly apologize to the duchess. The critics were too quick to give their verdict on us. We hope they'll be eating humble pie before the end of the season. Note: Humble pie is sometimes used in other structures with a similar meaning. After their victory, he took delight in handing out large helpings of humble pie to just about everyone. Note: `Umbles' is an old word for the guts and offal (= organs such as the liver) of deer. When rich people had the good parts of the meat to eat, the `umbles' were made into a pie for their servants. As `umbles' pie was eaten by `humble' people, the two words gradually became confused. `Humble pie' came to be used to refer to something humiliating or unpleasant.
See also: eat, humble, pie
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

as the crow flies

used to refer to a shorter distance in a straight line across country rather than the distance as measured along a more circuitous road.
See also: crow, flies

eat crow

be humiliated by your defeats or mistakes. North American informal
In the USA ‘boiled crow’ has been a metaphor for something extremely disagreeable since the late 19th century.
See also: crow, eat

eat dirt

suffer insults or humiliation. informal
In the USA eat dirt also has the sense of ‘make a humiliating retraction’ or ‘eat your words’.
See also: dirt, eat

eat humble pie

make a humble apology and accept humiliation.
Humble pie is from a mid 19th-century pun based on umbles , meaning ‘offal’, which was considered to be an inferior food.
1998 Spectator A white youth behind us did shout racial abuse. But…after the game was over his companions forced him to come up to Darcus to eat humble pie.
See also: eat, humble, pie
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

as the ˈcrow flies

(informal) (of a distance) measured in a straight line: From here to the village it’s five miles as the crow flies, but it’s a lot further by road.
See also: crow, flies

ˌeat humble ˈpie

(British English) (American English eat ˈcrow) say and show that you are sorry for a mistake that you made: I had to eat humble pie when Harry, who I said would never have any success, won first prize.This comes from a pun on the old word umbles, meaning ‘offal’ (= the inside parts of an animal), which was considered inferior food.
See also: eat, humble, pie

ˌstone the ˈcrows

,

ˌstone ˈme

(old-fashioned, British English) used to express surprise, shock, anger, etc: Stone the crows! You’re not going out dressed like that, are you?
See also: crow, stone
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

eat crow

tv. to display total humility, especially when shown to be wrong. Well, it looks like I was wrong, and I’m going to have to eat crow.
See also: crow, eat
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

as the crow flies

In a straight line.
See also: crow, flies

eat crow

To be forced to accept a humiliating defeat.
See also: crow, eat

eat humble pie

To be forced to apologize abjectly or admit one's faults in humiliating circumstances.
See also: eat, humble, pie
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

as the crow flies

By the most direct or shortest route. Since crows normally fly straight to their food supply, this simile came into use as the shortest distance between two points. It originated in the late eighteenth century or even earlier.
See also: crow, flies

eat crow/humble pie/dirt, to

To acknowledge an embarrassing error and humiliatingly abase oneself. All these expressions date from the early nineteenth century, eating crow from America and eating humble pie and dirt from Britain. The origin of the first is not known, although it is generally acknowledged that the meat of a crow tastes terrible. A story cited by Charles Funk and published in the Atlanta Constitution in 1888 claims that toward the end of the War of 1812, during a temporary truce, an American went hunting and by accident crossed behind the British lines, where he shot a crow. He was caught by an unarmed British officer who, by complimenting him on his fine shooting, persuaded him to hand over his gun. The officer then pointed the gun and said that as punishment for trespassing the American must take a bite out of the crow. The American obeyed, but when the officer returned his gun, he took his revenge and made the Briton eat the rest of the bird. The source of humble pie is less far-fetched; it is a corruption of (or pun on) umble-pie, “umbles” being dialect for the heart, liver, and entrails of the deer, which were fed to the hunt’s beaters and other servants while the lord and his guests ate the choice venison. This explanation appeared in 1830 in Vocabulary of East Anglia by Robert Forby. The analogy to eating dirt is self-evident. It appeared in Frederick W. Farrar’s Julian Home (1859): “He made up for the dirt they had been eating by the splendour of his entertainment.”
See also: crow, eat, humble, pie, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the experiment, which they called the 'cheeseburger supplementation experiment,' the researchers reportedly left cheeseburgers from McDonald's near some crow nests in rural New York.
Soni reckons the crows respond to his calls because they associate the sound to danger, and send out a warning call, called 'scolding', to alert their peers.
Meanwhile, municipal councillor, Dinesh Kushwaha said that crows are considered as ancestors according to Hindu religion and thus feeding them is a "work of great virtue".
That way the crows could still see the bones, but the minute they entered into the confined space formed by the wash basin, the stick would trip and the crow would be trapped inside.
Combine this intelligence with the fact that the birds have been a nuisance to farmers, and the basis for the prejudice some have against crows becomes understandable.
To help resolve the issue, the Department of Agriculture will step in and use lasers, pyrotechnics and high-volume recordings of crow noises to make them leave.
The old men's recollections of enemy attacks helped the young High Bird (Medicine Crow's Crow name) to understand why his people befriended the white man and served as allies in battles between the U.S.
Just like humans, the crows also seem to hate losing their tools as one was observed recovering its implement after dropping it on the forest floor.
In many lab tests, crows have linked successive steps together to complete a task, and even fashioned make-shift tools to help them along.
The new observations we report here of anting behavior by American and Northwestern Crows fit descriptions of passive anting (Simmons 1957, 1966), where birds settle on concentrations of ants and allow them to invade the plumage.
Lamb predation by crows isn't a big problem on the estate as local populations are actively managed, but other area may be less fortunate, he said.
Crows, arguably our most intelligent birds, quickly learn how easy it is to dine on the vulnerable plover chicks that walk visibly between the rack of seaweed and the shoreline.
A CROW rescued a baby pigeon from certain death by twice dragging it to safety from a busy road after it fell out of its nest.