cross the Rubicon

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cross the Rubicon

To commit to a particular plan or course of action that cannot be reversed. The phrase refers to how Julius Caesar crossed the Rubicon river and became embroiled in civil war in 49 BCE. Look, if you cheat on this test, you are crossing the Rubicon, man. You can't take that back. I think I crossed the Rubicon when I took this management position. It would be a huge pay cut to go back to my old job, and my boss would be furious.
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cross the Rubicon

Fig. to do something that inevitably commits one to following a certain course of action. (Alludes to the crossing of the River Rubicon by Julius Caesar with his army, which involved him in a civil war in B.C. 49.) Jane crossed the Rubicon by signing the contract. Find another job before you cross the Rubicon and resign from this one.
See also: cross, Rubicon

cross the Rubicon

Irrevocably commit to a course of action, make a fateful and final decision. For example, Once he submitted his resignation, he had crossed the Rubicon. This phrase alludes to Julius Caesar's crossing the Rubicon River (between Italy and Gaul) in 49 b.c., thereby starting a war against Pompey and the Roman Senate. Recounted in Plutarch's Lives: Julius Caesar (c. a.d. 110), the crossing gave rise to the figurative English usage by the early 1600s.
See also: cross, Rubicon

cross the Rubicon

FORMAL
If you cross the Rubicon, you make an important decision which cannot be changed and which will have very important consequences. Today the Government has crossed the Rubicon in favour of the Euro. In England and Wales the Rubicon has been crossed regarding the charging of fees to students. Note: This expression is variable, for example people sometimes talk about the crossing of the Rubicon or a crossing of the Rubicon. Such a decision would be a crossing of the Rubicon. Note: Sometimes this important decision is referred to as a person's Rubicon. There would be no turning back; if he was making a big mistake, this was his Rubicon. Note: The Rubicon was a small river which separated Roman Italy from Gaul, the province ruled by Julius Caesar. Caesar crossed the Rubicon in 49 BC, invaded Roman Italy, and started a civil war. `The die is cast' is based on the same incident.
See also: cross, Rubicon

cross the Rubicon

take an irrevocable step.
The Rubicon was a small river in north-east Italy which in the first century bc marked the boundary of Italy proper with the province of Cisalpine Gaul. By taking his army across the Rubicon into Italy in 49 bc , Julius Caesar broke the law forbidding a general to lead an army out of his own province, and so committed himself to war against the Senate and Pompey.
See also: cross, Rubicon

cross the ˈRubicon

(formal) reach a point where an important decision is taken which cannot be changed later: Today we cross the Rubicon. There is no going back.The Rubicon was a stream which formed the border between Italy and Gaul. When Julius Caesar broke the law by crossing it with his army, it led inevitably to war.
See also: cross, Rubicon
References in periodicals archive ?
John the Baptist,- Part 002 - preserving tapestries Captive Jugurta,- Part 003 - preserving tapestries Caesar crosses the Rubicon from the series Acts of Julius Caesar,- Part 004 - preserving two altars frontal,- Part 005 - preserving two dalmatics- Part 006 - preserving three Kasumi,- Part 007 - preserving screens,- Part 008 - preserving the guise of dresses and dresses for the Infant Jesus.
These spectres cannot be seen, heard or smelt by most humans until one vengeful Fade crosses the rubicon between the corporeal and ethereal and declares war on the living.
These spectres cannot be seen, heard or smelled by most humans until one vengeful Fade crosses the rubicon between the corporeal and ethereal and declares war on the living.
Like Caesar, Henman crosses the Rubicon next week en route to the Foro Italico in Rome.
By the time Caesar crosses the Rubicon, readers who have followed his story will understand how this step forever altered Caesar's life and the foundation for the Western world, in which personality and power shape reality as change.
John the Baptist,- Part 002 - preserving tapestries Captive Jugurta,- Part 003 - preserving tapestries Caesar crosses the Rubicon of the cycle deeds of Julius Caesar,- Part 004 - preserving two altars frontal,- Part 005 - preserving two dalmatics- Part 006 - preserving three Kasumi,- Part 007 - preserving screens,- Part 008 - preserving the guise of dresses and dresses for the Infant Jesus.