cross with


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cross with

1. verb To traverse something in a certain vehicle. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cross" and "with." Do you think we'll be able to cross the flood waters with this car?
2. verb To combine the genetic material of two different things. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cross" and "with." If you cross a Labrador retriever with a poodle, you get a labradoodle. I wonder what kind of hybrid we would create if we crossed these two flowers with each other.
3. adjective Angry or annoyed with someone. In this usage, "cross with" is a set phrase followed by a noun or pronoun. Of course I'm cross with you—you lied to me!
See also: cross

cross something with something

 
1. to go across something, using a particular type of vehicle. The explorers crossed the river with their Jeep. We can't cross this stream with the canoes. It's too fast.
2. to interbreed something with something else. The farmer crossed this smaller breed of chicken with the meatier one. It is possible to cross a horse with a donkey.
See also: cross
References in periodicals archive ?
In the process he criticizes another major North American interpreter of Luther's theology of the cross, Gerhard Forde, for failing to connect theology of the cross with the immense pain and absurdity experienced by millions in the world today (chap.
Adams said that the diocese had agreed to provide Holy Cross with a funding of $320,000 spread over a five-year period.
More than sinking to our knees, more than folding our hands together in prayer, more than bowing our heads under blessings, it is the making of the sign of the cross with our hands that marks us as Catholics--as men and women (and small children) who believe in the risen Christ, the God and man who died on a wooden crucifix on the Hill of Skulls, long centuries ago.
The crucifix (a cross with a corpus, the representation of the body of Jesus) was seldom publicly displayed until a century later.
The tau cross with a circle at the top, the crux ansata, was common to various Egyptian deities, including Isis and Osiris.
Many Catholic homes had and still have a crucifix: a metal corpus affixed to the cross with the inscription above the inclined and thorn-crowned head of Christ.
We are now brought to the Incarnation; we are now at the cross with Mary; we are now at the Mass.