cross that bridge when you come to it

cross that bridge when (one) comes to it

To address something only when it actually happens or becomes an issue. A: "Do you know if that road is still closed?" B: "No, so I guess we'll have to cross that bridge when we come to it." The job interview is a week away, so I'm not worried about it yet—I'll cross that bridge when I come to it.
See also: bridge, come, cross, that

cross that bridge when you come to it

If you say I'll cross that bridge when I come to it, you mean that you will deal with a problem if it happens. `You can't make me talk to you.' — `No, but the police can.' — `I'll cross that bridge when I come to it.' Note: You can also say things like I haven't crossed that bridge yet or there are still some bridges to cross when you have not yet dealt with a particular problem. We have not crossed that bridge yet. We are trying to get the criminal case dealt with. There are still a few bridges to cross.
See also: bridge, come, cross, that

cross that bridge when you come to it

deal with a problem when and if it arises.
1998 Spectator As to what would happen to the case for non-proliferation when the Cold War was won, the allies would cross that bridge when they came to it, which seemed at the time well beyond any foreseeable future.
See also: bridge, come, cross, that

cross that bridge when you come to it

Hold off making a decision until it is necessary; don’t anticipate trouble until it actually occurs. “Don’t cross the bridge till you come to it, is a proverb old and of excellent wit,” said Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (The Golden Legend, 1851), and eighty years later that witty playwright Noël Coward said, “I don’t believe in crying over my bridge before I’ve eaten it” (Private Lives, 1930). The ultimate origins of the term have been lost.
See also: bridge, come, cross, that
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