cross my heart (and hope to die)

(redirected from cross one's heart and hope to die)

cross my heart (and hope to die)

A vow that one is being truthful. Billy's the one who broke the cookie jar—cross my heart and hope to die! A: "Did you take that money?" B: "No, cross my heart!"
See also: cross, heart, hope, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

cross one's heart (and hope to die)

Fig. a phrase said to pledge or vow that the truth is being told. It's true, cross my heart and hope to die. It's really true—cross my heart.
See also: cross, heart
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cross my heart and hope to die

Attest to the truth of something; solemnly assure someone that the truth has been spoken. For example, I did lock the door-cross my heart and hope to die! This phrase most likely originated as a religious oath based on the sign of the cross; it is generally accompanied by hand gestures such as crossing one's hands over one's breast and then pointing the right hand skyward (a variant is cross my heart and point to God). Today most often uttered by children, it was first recorded in 1908.
See also: and, cross, die, heart, hope, to
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cross my heart

or

cross my heart and hope to die

SPOKEN
You can say cross my heart or cross my heart and hope to die when you want to assure someone that you are telling the truth. Note: The heart is traditionally regarded as the centre of the emotions. And I won't tell any of the other girls about it. I promise, cross my heart. Sam grinned and held out his hand toward her. `You don't have to worry, okay.' — `Are you sure?' Erin asked. — `Cross my heart and hope to die.' Note: This expression is used mainly by children. Note: This expression refers to the Christian practice of moving your hand across your chest in the shape of a cross.
See also: cross, heart
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

cross my heart

used to emphasize the truthfulness and sincerity of what you are saying or promising. informal
The full version of this expression is cross my heart and hope to die , and is sometimes reinforced by making a sign of the Cross over your chest.
See also: cross, heart
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

cross my ˈheart (and hope to ˈdie)

(spoken) used for emphasizing that you are sincere when making a promise, or that what you say is true: ‘Don’t tell anyone else about this, will you?’ ‘Cross my heart, I won’t.’
See also: cross, heart
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

cross my heart (and point to God/hope to die)

What I’m saying is really true. Originally a solemn oath for veracity, this phrase became a schoolyard assertion. The first version was traditionally accompanied by crossing one’s arms over the chest and then raising the right arm. The cliché dates from the second half of the 1800s. A twentieth-century synonym is Scout’s honor!, alluding to the promise of honesty taken by Boy (and Girl) Scouts. It dates from about 1900. J. A. Jance had it in her mystery novel, Devil’s Claw (2000), “Joanna was shocked. ‘You didn’t tell her that!’—Now it was Butch’s turn to grin. ‘I did,’ he said. ‘Scout’s honor.’” And Jan Burke even combined the two: “‘Swear you’ll keep me posted on your progress?’—‘Girl Scout’s honor. Or may I simply cross my heart?’” (Remember Me, Irene, 1996). Also see honest to goodness.
See also: cross, god, heart, hope, point, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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