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come a cropper

1. informal To fall down. Primarily heard in UK. These shoes are too big and caused me to come a cropper as I was walking down the street.
2. informal To fail completely. Primarily heard in UK. Once heralded as a future star of the tech world, Shane came a cropper when his product proved to be a dud.
See also: come, cropper

come a cropper

Fig. to have a misfortune; to fail. (Meaning 'fall off one's horse.') Bob invested all his money in the stock market just before it fell. Boy, did he come a cropper. Jane was out all night before she took her final. She really came a cropper.
See also: come, cropper

come a cropper

BRITISH, INFORMAL
COMMON
1. If someone comes a cropper, they suffer a sudden and embarrassing failure. Ferguson came a cropper when the economy collapsed. Scott must concentrate on learning his new trade. He will come a cropper if he thinks he knows it all before he starts. Banks dabbling in industry can easily come a cropper.
2. If you come a cropper, you accidentally fall and hurt yourself. She came a cropper on the last fence. I came a cropper on a patch of ice just outside my house. Note: `Cropper' may come from the expression `to fall neck and crop', meaning to fall heavily. A bird's `crop' is a pouch in its throat where it keeps food before digesting it.
See also: come, cropper

come a cropper

1 fall heavily. 2 suffer a defeat or disaster. informal
Sense 1 appears to have originated in mid 19th-century hunting jargon, and possibly came from the phrase neck and crop meaning ‘bodily’ or ‘completely’.
2 1980 Shirley Hazzard The Transit of Venus He had seen how people came a cropper by giving way to impulse.
See also: come, cropper

come a ˈcropper

(British English, informal)
1 fall (to the ground): Pete came a cropper on his motorbike and ended up in hospital.
2 fail badly, usually when you are expected to do well: She’s so confident she’ll pass her exams without doing any work, but I’ve got a feeling she’s going to come a real cropper.
See also: come, cropper

come a cropper

To fail utterly.
See also: come, cropper

come a-cropper

To fail badly. “Cropper” comes from a horse's croup or crupper, the part of the animal's back behind the saddle. Someone who parted company from his horse (an involuntary dismount, so to speak) was said to fall “neck and crop.” That became “come a-cropper,” first appearing in the foxhunting author Robert S. Surtees' 1858 novel Ask Mamma: [He] “rode at an impracticable fence, and got a cropper for his pains.” The phrase was picked up and applied to any misadventure, equestrian or otherwise.
See also: come
References in periodicals archive ?
I had expected the tikka to be pre-bought and processed, but I did the Croppers a disservice.
The Croppers offers a good range of inexpensive old favourites for desserts: lemon meringue pie, spotted dick and apple crumble, to name but a few, but sadly we had no room.
Mr Cropper paid tribute to his cousin, who was the only son of former West Lancs Rural District Council chairman John Cropper and Edith Cropper, who ran Hallsall Hall Farm near Ormskirk.
LONG SERVING: Nigel Saxton celebrating 25 years as landlord of the Croppers Arms
CORRIE youngster Chesney Brown could become a Cropper when mum Cilla leaves him home alone again and goes on holiday.
Joining the Luddite rebellion, a group of croppers took things into their own hands with fatal consequences.
CORONATION Street's Cropper family is finally completed with the arrival of a bouncing baby girl - named Patience after their battle to become parents.
It was here that the croppers met one night in April 1812 before lying in wait on Hartshead Moor and ambushing wagons carrying new cropping frames.
But, as the credits roll, he tearfully cuddles the baby and tells Tracy: "Give her to the Croppers.
Nigel Saxton, 52, is celebrating 20 years in charge of The Croppers Arms in Marsh by rolling back prices for one night only.
The Croppers refuse to abandon their plans and land Tracey with the ultimatum.
Now she has written A Perfect Duet: The Diary of Roy and Hayley Cropper, which gathers together all of Roy and Hayley's storylines in one place.
Environmentalist John Cropper, originally from Halsall, was found bound, gagged and with his throat cut alongside the bodies of his sister-in-law, Lynette Pearson and mother-in-law Maggie Lee.
Among the people held is a teenage relative of John Cropper, originally from Ormskirk, who has been charged with his murder.