cropper


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Related to cropper: come a cropper
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come a cropper

1. slang To fall down. Primarily heard in UK. These shoes are too big and caused me to come a cropper as I was walking down the street.
2. slang To fail completely. Primarily heard in UK. Once heralded as a future star of the tech world, Shane came a cropper when his product proved to be a dud.
See also: come, cropper
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

come a cropper

Fig. to have a misfortune; to fail. (Meaning 'fall off one's horse.') Bob invested all his money in the stock market just before it fell. Boy, did he come a cropper. Jane was out all night before she took her final. She really came a cropper.
See also: come, cropper
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

come a cropper

BRITISH, INFORMAL
COMMON
1. If someone comes a cropper, they suffer a sudden and embarrassing failure. Ferguson came a cropper when the economy collapsed. Scott must concentrate on learning his new trade. He will come a cropper if he thinks he knows it all before he starts. Banks dabbling in industry can easily come a cropper.
2. If you come a cropper, you accidentally fall and hurt yourself. She came a cropper on the last fence. I came a cropper on a patch of ice just outside my house. Note: `Cropper' may come from the expression `to fall neck and crop', meaning to fall heavily. A bird's `crop' is a pouch in its throat where it keeps food before digesting it.
See also: come, cropper
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

come a cropper

1 fall heavily. 2 suffer a defeat or disaster. informal
Sense 1 appears to have originated in mid 19th-century hunting jargon, and possibly came from the phrase neck and crop meaning ‘bodily’ or ‘completely’.
2 1980 Shirley Hazzard The Transit of Venus He had seen how people came a cropper by giving way to impulse.
See also: come, cropper
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

come a ˈcropper

(British English, informal)
1 fall (to the ground): Pete came a cropper on his motorbike and ended up in hospital.
2 fail badly, usually when you are expected to do well: She’s so confident she’ll pass her exams without doing any work, but I’ve got a feeling she’s going to come a real cropper.
See also: come, cropper
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

come a cropper

To fail utterly.
See also: come, cropper
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

come a-cropper

To fail badly. “Cropper” comes from a horse's croup or crupper, the part of the animal's back behind the saddle. Someone who parted company from his horse (an involuntary dismount, so to speak) was said to fall “neck and crop.” That became “come a-cropper,” first appearing in the foxhunting author Robert S. Surtees' 1858 novel Ask Mamma: [He] “rode at an impracticable fence, and got a cropper for his pains.” The phrase was picked up and applied to any misadventure, equestrian or otherwise.
See also: come
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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References in periodicals archive ?
Music in the Round was the brainchild of Peter Cropper who came up with the idea several years ago when he was leader of the acclaimed Lindsay String Quartet.
Similarly, Cropper suggests it would be a misconception to assume the Olympic Games were seen as a celebration of sports for all, as they are now.
The AQM men escaped from the Camp Cropper prison complex, near Baghdad International Airport, on July 20, though Iraqi officials did not make the news public for 48 hours.
At the request of the Iraqi authorities, US wardens will continue to guard around 200 of Cropper's 1,500 detainees.
Cropper was originally a tented site but it was upgraded after the Abu Ghraib prison scandal in 2004 where photographs showed naked and hooded Iraqi prisoners being beaten and humiliated by their US guards.
For example, Cropper does not discuss horsemanship, and yet, the horse was a powerful symbol of a historical (and "natural," it was believed) privilege to lead both at home and on the battlefield.
It is worth a careful read not just to absorb Cropper's patiently researched investigation of this particular incident and its fortuna critica, but also as a model of art-historical research employing all the tools and approaches available to work out from the specific images to others of similar themes and then to broader issues of imitation versus emulation, or innovation versus tradition.
Somewhere near Baghdad International Airport is a U.S.-run prison with the stern designation ''High Value Detention Site'' and the jaunty name of Camp Cropper. It was in the news last week following reports of a visit by Iraq's new minister for human rights, Bakhtiar Amin, to the prison's most highly valued detainee, ousted Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, whose life has certainly come a cropper since a U.S.-led coalition invaded his country last year.
Even though they are running late, Cropper stops inspecting their bags to hug and kiss her "angel boys." She licks her fingertips to reshape their eyebrows and playfully pats their hair.
When Potts, 42, Mercer, 37, and 36-year-old Cropper realised that the incident had been caught on their club's security camera, they hatched a plan to blackmail multi-millionaire Crowe.
In their study, economists Maureen Cropper of the University of Maryland and George Van Houtven of East Carolina University examined regulations under three environmental laws: the asbestos ban under the Toxic Substances Control Act; pesticides regulated by the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act from 1975 to 1989; and air pollutants governed by the Clean Air Act from 1975 to 1990.
(Alliance News) - Paper and technical fibre maker James Cropper PLC held its dividend Tuesday after annual profit fell sharply amid rising raw material costs, despite revenue and underlying performance continuing to strengthen.
CAFE owner Roy Cropper dramatically leapt out of the way of a car in Wednesday's episode of Coronation Street.
IT is a moment in his life which former Mail telephonist Ian Cropper insists he will never forget.