crop

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Related to cropped: cropped up, cropped out

neck and crop

Totally and completely, often abruptly. I can't believe you're just going to stop financially supporting me neck and crop! How am I supposed to buy groceries this week? Even though they got an early lead, we came back and beat them neck and crop!
See also: and, crop, neck

the cream of the crop

The best of a particular group. We need to draft this player—he's definitely the cream of the crop. These delicious strawberries are the cream of the crop.
See also: cream, crop, of

crop out

1. To adjust the borders of a photograph so that someone or something is removed from it. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "crop" and "out." I think the picture will look better if you crop out those trashcans in the background. Wow, I look terrible in that photo. Please crop me out!
2. To become exposed or reach the surface, as of a physical object. Look at this layer of rock that has cropped out!
3. By extension, to become overt or noticeable, as of an emotion or concept. I knew my fears would crop out before I could actually jump from the plane.
See also: crop, out

crop up

To suddenly occur or become noticeable. I knew my fears would crop up before I could actually jump from the plane. Problems always seem to crop up when we're about to go away on vacation.
See also: crop, up

cream of the crop

Fig. the best of all. This particular car is the cream of the crop. These three students are very bright. They are the cream of the crop in their class.
See also: cream, crop, of

crop out

to appear on the surface; [for something] to reveal itself in the open; to begin to show above the surface. A layer of rock cropped out at the edges of the desert.
See also: crop, out

crop someone or something out

[for a photographer] to cut or trim out someone or something from a photograph. The photographer cropped Mr. Jones out of the picture. See if you can crop out the ugly fence at the side of the house.
See also: crop, out

crop up

to appear without warning; to happen suddenly; [for something] to begin to reveal itself in the open. Some new problems cropped up at the last minute.
See also: crop, up

Good seed makes a good crop.

Prov. Starting with good materials will help you get good results. Jill: Elsie and Jim are going to have a baby. Jane: I'm sure it will be a good child, since they're both such good people. Good seed makes a good crop. I am sure Robert's business will flourish. He's capable and honest, and good seed makes a good crop.
See also: crop, good, make, seed

cream of the crop, the

The best or choicest of anything, as in The apples from this orchard are definitely the cream of the crop. The noun cream has been used to mean "the best" since the 16th century. The French equivalent of the present term, la crème de la crème ("the cream of the cream") was familiar in English by 1800.
See also: cream, of

crop out

Rise to the surface, become visible or evident, as in These superstitions crop out time and again. This term originated in mining, where a stratum or vein of ore is said to crop out when it comes to the surface. [Mid-1800s]
See also: crop, out

crop up

Appear unexpectedly or occasionally, as in One theory that crops up periodically is the influence of sunspots on stock prices, or We hope new talent will crop up in the next freshman class. [Mid-1800s]
See also: crop, up

the cream of the crop

If you talk about the cream of the crop, you mean the best people or things in a particular set or group. The first Midlands media degree show features the cream of the crop of this year's graduates in photography, film, and video. They are among the cream of the crop of emerging architects in Scotland.
See also: cream, crop, of

crop up

v.
To happen or appear, often unexpectedly: Errors have cropped up in the report despite all our proofreading.
See also: crop, up
References in classic literature ?
One has hair cropped to his skull, but a scarf to hide his neck; the other has low shirt-collars, but long hair to bide his skull.
An enormous fellow, with a great red face and cropped moustache, occupied my poor father's place; he it was who had replaced our fruitful vineries with his stinking stables; but I am bound to own he looked a genial clod, as he sat in his fat and listened to the young bloods boasting of their prowess, or elaborately explaining their mishaps.
The matter has already cropped up in negotiations between Mr.
The Emperor had often visited the Military College and every time Kasatsky saw that tall erect figure, with breast expanded in its military overcoat, entering with brisk step, saw the cropped side-whiskers, the moustache, the aquiline nose, and heard the sonorous voice exchanging greetings with the cadets, he was seized by the same rapture that he experienced later on when he met the woman he loved.
She (for the newcomer showed such evidences of sex as cropped hair and a manly stride) took a seat in their midst, and smiling a superior smile explained:
David Chorley and Douglas Bower, admitted to creating many of the giant, circular wheat-field patterns that cropped up over the last decade in southern England.