croak

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croak

1. slang To die. How are we going to tell the kids that their fish croaked while they were at school?
2. slang To kill someone or something. We all watched in horror as the lion croaked its prey.

croak out

To say something in a low, gruff, possibly emotional voice. A noun or pronoun can be used between "croak" and "out." I wanted to say a few remarks at the funeral, but I had a hard time croaking them out.
See also: croak, out
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

croak

1. in. to die; to expire; to succumb. The parrot croaked before I got it home.
2. tv. to kill someone or something. The car croaked the cat just like that.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Bully--what a terrible name," he croaked. "It has brought me nothing but trouble."
"How can I make friends if no one gives me a chance?" Bully croaked to himself.
To track the nation's declining amphibian population and pinpoint the most critical habitats, croaks are counted for three minutes every two weeks.
Joao's extraordinary expressive range reached from guttural croaks to coloratura trilling, with scatting and vocalizing in between.
The sound of a laugh also varies enormously, from pig snorts, to frog croaks and bird chirps.
When an intruder croaks, small male green frogs (Rana clamitans) drop their responding croaks extra low, like genuine big guys, say Mark A.
Sherwin Nuland, currently the hot guru on how we die, barely croaks about ultimate meaning.
(Say I am dying and a shaman croaks, with fresher wisdom and better jokes: the gods fly, deaf to my remarks, "I am the password and the pass.
They will eat almost anything that walks, flies, croaks, creeps or slithers.
One frog who croaks, waits, and croaks again often finds a neighbor croaking during the pauses.
Basically, he who croaks first, even by a few milliseconds, gets the girl.
Mrs Watt's husband, James, 66, identified the three frogs and the loud croaks activated in court.
For a high-tech demonstration of how covering frogs' ears quiets their croaks, Purgue crafted bits of foam and a spring into frog earmuffs.