crisco


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crisco

(ˈkrɪsko)
n. a fat person. (Cruel. Also a rude term of address. The brand name of a baking shortening.) Some crisco came in and ordered ten large fries.
References in periodicals archive ?
Crisco recommends the shrimp and grits, while Burgess is partial to the chicken enchiladas.
First-place winners in the amateur and professional divisions will each receive $2,000, a gift basket packed with Crisco baking products, and a special trophy.
The company has offered a year's supply of Crisco Olive Oil products and cookware set with a grand prize of a round trip for two to Italy to the contest winners.
To make mine authentic I've used two US ingredients: Crisco, a creamy white vegetable fat, and Marshmallow Fluff, a sweet fluffy concoction.
reason: A lot of people who watch your show have noticed that, in between the unicorns and the Crisco, there's actually some serious policy wonkery.
lt;p>"Technology-driven projects like this may bring fewer overall jobs than traditional industry, but they have a tremendous economic impact through locally purchased goods and services," Keith Crisco, the state's commerce secretary, said in a statement.
For instance, when Crisco wasn't selling well in the South because people were still using lard, we sent home economists out to talk shows to talk about recipes using Crisco.
Crisco now offers three olive oils imported from various countries (Italy, Turkey, Spain, Tunisia or Argentina) that are bottled in the United States.
It seems that caribou, seal, and moose fats are far more healthful than unnatural fats such as Crisco and other vegetable shortenings.
Goldberg chuckles that "there's probably a tank farm somewhere filled with Crisco.
The line-up also includes hilarious comedy instrumentalist BILLY BEDLAM and the amazing comedian and magician CRISCO, who this year celebrates 50 years as a professional entertainer.
Smucker said the deal increases the company's presence in the baking aisle, alongside the Crisco, Pillsbury, Martha White, White Lily and PET brands in the United States and the Crisco, Robin Hood and Five Roses brands in Canada.
That's the combo in the newly reformulated transfree Crisco shortening.
Trans fats go back to the invention of Crisco (1909), but their presence in commercially prepared baked and fried foods increased in the seventies and eighties, when butter was seized upon by dietitians as the "Ingredient of Death," and groups like the Center for Science in the Public Interest attacked fast-food restaurants for cramming patrons full of lard and tallow.
He outlines how the original home economics pioneers who dreamed of freeing women from the drudgery of housework and food preparation taught schoolgirls to buy and prepare instant processed foods such as Jello, Wonder Bread, and Crisco Oil.