credibility gap

(redirected from credibility gaps)
Also found in: Dictionary.

credibility gap

The discrepancy between the lofty promises that a person makes and the resulting action or situation. The politician suffered a credibility gap regarding his claims about the economy's improvement because his constituents were still unable to find work.
See also: gap

credibility gap

Distrust of a public statement or position, as in The current credibility gap at City Hall is the result of miscommunication between the mayor's office and the press . This term originated about 1960 in connection with the American public's disinclination to believe government statements about the Vietnam War. It soon was extended to individuals and corporations as well as government agencies to express a lack of confidence in the truth of their statements, or perception of a discrepancy between words and actions.
See also: gap

credibility gap

Lack of belief in a statement or policy. This phrase came into being in 1965 during the Vietnam War, when the American public became aware of differences between what the government said and what actually happened. After the war it was extended to discrepancies between the words and actions of both individuals and corporations. Some believe this term was spawned by the missile gap invoked during the 1960 presidential campaign, when John F. Kennedy charged that U.S. missile production was lagging behind the Soviet Union’s. Soon after the election the charge was dismissed as false. Since then, according to William Safire, “missile gap” has been used to mean exaggerated and misleading claims.
See also: gap
References in periodicals archive ?
In the credibility gap of a Second World country, the two big mantras of accountability and scrutiny dominate public messages and processes.
In this model, media exposure on public opinion is mediated by the degree of the perceived media credibility gap between the competing media outlets.
We may hypothesize that the aforementioned competition between transnational and domestic Arab satellite TV in Lebanon may result in a perceived credibility gap between the two sets of outlets.
In addition to the perceived credibility gap between the two sets of channels, we are interested in how media exposure and credibility are associated with opinion formation.
H4: The perceived media credibility gap will mediate the relationships between exposure to TSTV and DSTV and opinions of the United States.
RQ2: How might Lebanese religious-political identities (i.e., Christian, Sunni, Shia, Druze) moderate the relationships between media exposure to transnational and domestic satellite television and the perceived credibility gap?
The last independent variable entered into the model was an indicator of the perceived credibility gap between DSTV and TSTV.
Our data analysis assessed the mediating role of a perceived credibility gap between transnational and domestic Arab satellite TV and anti-American sentiment, as well as whether religious identity moderated the effects of media exposure on perceived credibility and/or public opinion about the United States.
The model was fit with our focal independent variables of exposure to domestic and transnational TV news predicting anti-American sentiment and the perceived credibility gap between transnational and domestic news entered into the model as a mediating variable.
Our analysis explored the mediating role of a perceived credibility gap between transnational and domestic TV as well as the moderating roles of religious identity.
This analysis reveals that TSTV news exposure influences the perceived credibility gap between transnational and domestic TV news (b = .23, p < .001) in favor of TSTV news, as hypothesized in H1.
In this equation, TSTV news exposure has a negative direct effect (H3) on negative evaluations of the United States (b = -.09, p < .01) as well as a total indirect effect through the perceived credibility gap (b = -.02, p < .01).
DSTV news consumption is completely mediated for non-Christian viewers by the perceived credibility gap, with a significant indirect effect (b = .05, p < .001) on anti-American sentiment.
In this sense, our study suggests that broadcasters who hope to shape public opinion need to focus on building credibility among audiences relative to their competitors, because the perceived credibility gap between competing news sources will attenuate any effects from exposure to their content on opinion formation.