credence

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lend support to (something)

1. To embellish something; to add information or details to something, especially to make it seem more credible or probable. He splashed mud all over his car and clothes to lend support to his story about being in the mountains all weekend. We cannot do anything that will lend support to our opponents' allegations about us.
2. To give something one's support or assistance. The president is lending support to the governor's re-election campaign. Your department will have responsibility for the project, but the sales team will lend support if needed.
See also: lend, support

lend credence to (something)

To embellish something; to add information or details to something, especially to make it seem more credible or probable. He splashed mud all over his car and clothes to lend credence to his story about being in the mountains all weekend. We cannot do anything that will lend credence to our opponents' allegations about us.
See also: credence, lend

give credence to someone or something

to consider someone or something as believable or trustworthy. How can you give credence to a person like Henry? I can't give any credence to Donald. He tells lies. Don't give credence to what he says. Please don't give credence to that newspaper article.
See also: credence, give

lend supˈport, ˈweight, ˈcredence, etc. to something

make something seem more likely to be true or genuine: This latest evidence lends support to her theory.
See also: lend, something
References in periodicals archive ?
In its simplest form, it says that necessarily and regardless of one's credence distribution, certain point-values must be high and the rest low.
o] ("A-halo") such that, necessarily, for any credence distribution C,
Necessarily, and regardless of one's credence distribution, one must desire A exactly to the extent that one believes it to be good.
The refutation by redistribution of credence given in my previous paper was needlessly complicated.
In the first place, DACB is immune to refutation by redistribution of credence.
DACB continues to hold under redistributions of credence, and in particular under redistributions by conditionalizing on A or on B.
If not, we could distribute credence in such a way as to make C(A) positive, and also make C([A.
Let C be any distribution that gives W positive credence.
They are those in which, no matter how we choose A and C, we cannot give positive credence to all three of A, (A^[A.
Instead, since it holds for all credence distributions, we have
We have not supposed that each agent might have his own personal halo function in the same way that he has his own personal credence and value functions.