creature

(redirected from creatureliness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to creatureliness: creaturely
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

creature feature

A horror film in which the central focus is on one or more monsters. I miss the creature features of the '50s and '60s—they were so campy and fun, unlike the dull CGI films of today.
See also: creature, feature

creature of habit

One who prefers the comfort and reliability of routine and habitual behavior. My brother is far too much a creature of habit to be up for something like backpacking across Europe. I know we're told to shuck our routines and live spontaneously, but I'm a creature of habit—it's just easier when you know exactly how each day will pan out.
See also: creature, habit, of

creature comforts

Things that one needs in order to feel happy and comfortable. I have a hard time abandoning my creature comforts to go hiking and camping. At a minimum, I need running water!
See also: comfort, creature

out in the cold

Ignored, forgotten, or excluded, as from a group, activity, benefit, etc. You have to make sure you stand out in a company, or you might be left in the cold when it comes time to hand out promotions. Our constituency feels it has really been kept out in the cold during the debate around this topic. I felt a bit out in the cold at Janet's party last night.
See also: cold, out

crawling with some kind of creature

[of a surface] covered with insects or animals, moving about. The basement was crawling with rats! We came home and found the kitchen floor crawling with ants.
See also: crawl, creature, kind, of

creature comforts

things that make people comfortable. The hotel room was a bit small, but all the creature comforts were there.
See also: comfort, creature

inject (something) into (someone, something, or some creature)

 and inject (someone, something, or some creature) with (something)
to give a hypodermic injection of something to someone or an animal. The nurse injected the medicine into my arm. He injected a very large dose into the patient.

inject something into something

 
1. Lit. to squirt something, such as oil, water, etc., into something. The pump injected the oil into the wheel bearings when I squeezed the lever. The mechanic injected a solvent into the lock.
2. Fig. to put something, such as humor, excitement, etc., into a situation. Let's inject a little humor into this dismal affair. She likes to inject a lot of excitement into her books.

leave (someone, something, or some creature) alone

 and let (someone, something, or some creature) alone; leave (someone, something, or some creature) be; let (someone, something, or some creature) be
to stop bothering someone or something. Don't torment the cat. Leave it alone. I don't want your help. Let me alone. Don't argue about it. Let it be!
See also: alone, leave

*out in the cold

 
1. Lit. outdoors where it is cold. (*Typically: be ~; keep someone or some creature ~; leave someone or some creature ~; put someone or some creature ~.) Open the door! Let me in! Don't keep me out in the cold! Who left the dog out in the cold all night?
2. Fig. not informed about what is happening or has happened. (*Typically: be ~; keep someone ~; leave someone ~.) Don't keep your supervisor out in the cold. Tell her what's going on. Please don't leave me out in the cold. Share the news with me!
3. Fig. excluded. (*Typically: be ~; keep someone ~; leave someone ~.) There was a party last night, but my friends left me out in the cold. When it came to the final prizes in the dog show, they left our animals out in the cold.
See also: cold, out

put some creature out of its misery

to kill an animal in a humane manner. (See also put one out of one's misery.) The vet put that dog with cancer out of its misery. Please, put my sick goldfish out of its misery.
See also: creature, misery, of, out, put

someone's time has come

 and some creature's time has come
Euph. someone or some creature is about to die. The poor old dog's time has come. My time has come. I'm ready to go.
See also: come, time

creature comfort

Something that contributes to physical comfort, such as food, clothing, or housing. For example, Dean always stayed in the best hotels; he valued his creature comforts. This idiom was first recorded in 1659.
See also: comfort, creature

out in the cold

Excluded from benefits given to others, neglected, as in Her stand on abortion left her out in the cold with the party. This idiom alludes to being left outdoors without shelter. [Mid-1800s] Also see come in from the cold.
See also: cold, out

creature comforts

Creature comforts are all the modern sleeping, eating, and washing facilities that make life easy and pleasant. Each room has its own patio or balcony and provides guests with all modern creature comforts. I'm not a camper — I like my creature comforts too much. Note: An old meaning of `creatures' is material comforts, or things that make you feel comfortable.
See also: comfort, creature

creature of habit

a person who follows an unvarying routine.
See also: creature, habit, of

a creature of ˈhabit

a person who always does certain things at certain times: My grandfather is a real creature of habit — he likes his meals at the same time every day.
See also: creature, habit, of

out in the cold

Lacking benefits given to others; neglected.
See also: cold, out
References in periodicals archive ?
A postmodern, green, ecological experience of nature can be a pretheoretical, fragmentary, nonsystematic remembering of primordial faith that biblical and traditional teachings have interpreted as creatureliness.
As an ethics of life, creatureliness does not simply denote embodiment but a particular comportment towards the finitude, abundance, and vulnerability of materiality recognized as necessity.
Mindful of the spirit, Byrd is also acutely aware of his creatureliness and its requirements for physical experiences of beauty and love.
It is pregnant with our complete conversion; for it announces the transformation of our creatureliness into freedom.
Dit is, volgens haar, juis die vrees wat dreig om die dekadente en estete van die fin de siecle te oorweldig: "The manifest subjection of women to the biological processes reminds man of his own creatureliness, of his own biological origin and therefore his own, no less biological death" (De Beauvoir 1989: 190).
46) "The prison of one's character is painstakingly built to deny one thing and one thing alone: one's creatureliness.
For many of us, it is difficult to imagine how we might be imitators of Noah as the one who leads us into true creatureliness.
This is why we need to recover an understanding of Christian practice and discipleship as a "schooling in the ways of creatureliness," where we learn "that courtesy to creatures in which reverence for the Creator finds expression" (Lash, "Creation" 173).
In fact, Sutter lives as an autonomous man who rejects creatureliness under God, refuses to acknowledge sin, and refuses "life in the spirit.
At the root of our irresponsible exploitation of the earth is a refusal to accept the inherent limitations of our creatureliness.
When we want to try to understand embodiment and the gifts of our creatureliness, however, the impulse to dissect is not for the sake of examination.
Whereas the Rational Mind is the mind of analysis, explanation, and manipulation, the Sympathetic Mind is the mind of our creatureliness.