creature

(redirected from creatureliness)
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Related to creatureliness: creaturely

creature feature

A horror film in which the central focus is on one or more monsters. I miss the creature features of the '50s and '60s—they were so campy and fun, unlike the dull CGI films of today.
See also: creature, feature

creature of habit

One who prefers the comfort and reliability of routine and habitual behavior. My brother is far too much a creature of habit to be up for something like backpacking across Europe. I know we're told to shuck our routines and live spontaneously, but I'm a creature of habit—it's just easier when you know exactly how each day will pan out.
See also: creature, habit, of

creature comforts

Things that one needs in order to feel happy and comfortable. I have a hard time abandoning my creature comforts to go hiking and camping. At a minimum, I need running water!
See also: comfort, creature

put (someone or something) out of its/(one's) misery

1. To kill someone or something as a means to ending suffering. Considering the dog's extensive wounds, the vet encouraged us to put him out of his misery.
2. To quell one's curiosity. Oh, just put me out of my misery and tell me how the movie ends!
See also: misery, of, out, put

crawl with (someone or something)

To be filled or covered with people or things in motion. Ugh, the mall is crawling with teenagers tonight—let's get out of here. We took off running when we realized that the tree stump was crawling with bugs.
See also: crawl

out in the cold

Ignored, forgotten, or excluded, as from a group, activity, benefit, etc. You have to make sure you stand out in a company, or you might be left in the cold when it comes time to hand out promotions. Our constituency feels it has really been kept out in the cold during the debate around this topic. I felt a bit out in the cold at Janet's party last night.
See also: cold, out

crawling with some kind of creature

[of a surface] covered with insects or animals, moving about. The basement was crawling with rats! We came home and found the kitchen floor crawling with ants.
See also: crawl, creature, kind, of

creature comforts

things that make people comfortable. The hotel room was a bit small, but all the creature comforts were there.
See also: comfort, creature

inject (something) into (someone, something, or some creature)

 and inject (someone, something, or some creature) with (something)
to give a hypodermic injection of something to someone or an animal. The nurse injected the medicine into my arm. He injected a very large dose into the patient.

inject something into something

 
1. Lit. to squirt something, such as oil, water, etc., into something. The pump injected the oil into the wheel bearings when I squeezed the lever. The mechanic injected a solvent into the lock.
2. Fig. to put something, such as humor, excitement, etc., into a situation. Let's inject a little humor into this dismal affair. She likes to inject a lot of excitement into her books.

leave (someone, something, or some creature) alone

 and let (someone, something, or some creature) alone; leave (someone, something, or some creature) be; let (someone, something, or some creature) be
to stop bothering someone or something. Don't torment the cat. Leave it alone. I don't want your help. Let me alone. Don't argue about it. Let it be!
See also: alone, leave

*out in the cold

 
1. Lit. outdoors where it is cold. (*Typically: be ~; keep someone or some creature ~; leave someone or some creature ~; put someone or some creature ~.) Open the door! Let me in! Don't keep me out in the cold! Who left the dog out in the cold all night?
2. Fig. not informed about what is happening or has happened. (*Typically: be ~; keep someone ~; leave someone ~.) Don't keep your supervisor out in the cold. Tell her what's going on. Please don't leave me out in the cold. Share the news with me!
3. Fig. excluded. (*Typically: be ~; keep someone ~; leave someone ~.) There was a party last night, but my friends left me out in the cold. When it came to the final prizes in the dog show, they left our animals out in the cold.
See also: cold, out

put some creature out of its misery

to kill an animal in a humane manner. (See also put one out of one's misery.) The vet put that dog with cancer out of its misery. Please, put my sick goldfish out of its misery.
See also: creature, misery, of, out, put

someone's time has come

 and some creature's time has come
Euph. someone or some creature is about to die. The poor old dog's time has come. My time has come. I'm ready to go.
See also: come, time

creature comfort

Something that contributes to physical comfort, such as food, clothing, or housing. For example, Dean always stayed in the best hotels; he valued his creature comforts. This idiom was first recorded in 1659.
See also: comfort, creature

out in the cold

Excluded from benefits given to others, neglected, as in Her stand on abortion left her out in the cold with the party. This idiom alludes to being left outdoors without shelter. [Mid-1800s] Also see come in from the cold.
See also: cold, out

creature comforts

Creature comforts are all the modern sleeping, eating, and washing facilities that make life easy and pleasant. Each room has its own patio or balcony and provides guests with all modern creature comforts. I'm not a camper — I like my creature comforts too much. Note: An old meaning of `creatures' is material comforts, or things that make you feel comfortable.
See also: comfort, creature

creature of habit

a person who follows an unvarying routine.
See also: creature, habit, of

a creature of ˈhabit

a person who always does certain things at certain times: My grandfather is a real creature of habit — he likes his meals at the same time every day.
See also: creature, habit, of

out in the cold

Lacking benefits given to others; neglected.
See also: cold, out

creature comforts

Life’s material amenities. The term dates from the seventeenth century; it appears in Thomas Brooks’s Collected Works (1670), and again in Matthew Henry’s 1710 Commentaries on the Psalms (“They have . . . the sweetest relish of their creature comforts”).
See also: comfort, creature
References in periodicals archive ?
Part of Jones's deep love for animals was their constancy in relation to history--a pony grazing that same patch of grass in the time of Roman Britain would look no different from the pony grazing in 1926--and in 1935 Jones would name his 'affection for the intimate creatureliness of things' as a central part of his philosophy as an artist.
Despite an ecological awakening, an inaccessible sense of creatureliness saps faith and justice.
Here worldliness, creatureliness, and also materiality, not sinfulness, seem to be the other of godliness.
Otto interprets dependence and defines creatureliness in terms of interconnectedness of everything.
Her reindeer outfit suggests her yearning for a shared creatureliness that has been lost in consumer culture, but when read as a Rudolph outfit it also gestures toward the loss of a Christmas fantasy world.
Although this white ape escapes the dangers that surrounded him in the tropical island, he is unable to repress or abject his own creatureliness: you may get the man out of the tropical jungle, so the novel suggests, but you cannot get the ape out of the man.
As Max Weber wrote, "the world as a creation of god, whose power comes to expression in it despite its creatureliness, provides the only medium through which one's unique religious charisma must prove itself by means of rational ethical action, so that one may become and remain certain of one's own state of grace." (69)
It can remind me of my creatureliness and finitude, of the fragile, ephemeral nature of my existence, of my own neediness and the vulnerability of others.
It seems that through contemplation any particular aspect of creatureliness could potentially reveal Christ.
(48) Creaturely ethics does not justify itself at the level of materiality and finitude because these alone do not constitute an obligation or a command; nor does creatureliness simply ascribe the sanctity of matter to a source outside the world.
Hence in anthropological materialism, political materialism and physical creatureliness are densely intertwined.
creatureliness is in the same category with "the quick jerboa
This freedom grows not from a religiosity that intends to expand the limits of human self-realization, but from the responsible affirmation of our finite existence and our creatureliness. I think the new directions on the path of discipleship that we can see in Dietrich Bonhoeffer must lead us today into such maturity.
(12) If anything, the sexual bodies that we inhabit, that we love and care for in their finite creatureliness, are not understandable apart from their theological determinations, which need not, in the end, be ontotheological in any sense, though what this looks like, or should appear to us as such, remains unclear indeed.
Goldenberg, Tom Pyszczynski & David Weise, Disgust, Creatureliness and the Accessibility of Death-Related Thoughts, 37 EVR.