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crater face

derogatory slang Someone with very bad acne or severe scarring therefrom. Sometimes hyphenated. I was a bit of a crater face in high school, but thankfully my face cleared up in college. Wow, a crater-face like you will never get a date to the dance!
See also: crater, face

crater

1. n. an acne scar. Walter was always sort of embarrassed about his craters.
2. in. to collapse and go down as with a falling stock price. The stock cratered and probably won’t recover for a year or two.

crater-face

and pizza-face and pizza-puss and zit-face
n. a person with acne or many acne scars. (Intended as jocular. Rude and derogatory.) I gotta get some kind of medicine for these pimples. I’m getting to be a regular crater-face. I don’t want to end up a zit-face, but I love chocolate!
References in periodicals archive ?
Aside from the size of the crater, the researchers also noticed that a portion of Lomonosov's wall or rim was missing, which suggests that it was destroyed following the displacement of a huge body of water.
According to the scientists, younger craters tend to be covered by more boulders and rocks than older craters.
Caption: Tswaing crater in South Africa, as seen from a plane
The second Meteor Crater Experiment (METCRAX II) meteorological field campaign was conducted in October 2013 in and around the Barringer Meteorite Crater (also known as Meteor Crater) near Winslow, Arizona (Fig.
The spacecraft mapped Shackleton crater with unprecedented detail, using a laser to illuminate the crater's interior and measure its albedo or natural reflectance.
Batches of paint that crater sometimes can be saved by high shear agitation for an hour or so and I have seen pigmented paints that no longer produced craters after being run through the mill a second time.
The crater was formed when a rising plume of magma encountered a pocket of underground water, resulting in a so called phreatomagmatic explosion.
Create a bar graph to show the diameter of each crater in kilometers.
Historically, a number of double craters, with straight segments separating them, have been found.
As you scan the lunar surface, you'll notice that some craters, such as Plato, Archimedes, and Ptolemaeus, have smooth, nearly featureless floors.
About 144 million years ago, a large asteroid slammed into southern Africa, blasting a crater that measures 70 kilometers (43 miles) across.
Make sure that your craters and mountains are highlighted from the same direction.
An engineer reconnaissance revealed that the craters averaged more than 40 feet in diameter and 8 feet in depth.
``We avoided the obvious craters we could see but high-resolution images from NASA now show this crater in the middle of the site.''
However, no area is without risk, and craters are scattered all over the Red Planet.