crash

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a crash course

A quick yet thorough tutorial on some topic or process. I got a crash course in answering the phones before the receptionist went on vacation.
See also: course, crash

crash and burn

1. Literally, to crash and catch fire. Typically said of a car or airplane. Her car crashed and burned, but she survived the accident.
2. To fail at something completely and dramatically. I really hope this business venture doesn't crash and burn—I'll be broke if it does. My attempt to make a speech before the whole student body really crashed and burned when I got on stage and forgot everything I was supposed to say.
3. In sports, to experience a significant accident or crash and thus have to withdraw from a competition. Alex isn't competing today because she crashed and burned on her practice run last night.
See also: and, burn, crash

crash around

To make a lot of noise while doing something. Dad woke us all up when he came home late and promptly crashed around the dark living room. You can always count on Patty to crash around in the kitchen while she's cooking. Pots and pans have never sounded louder!
See also: around, crash

crash bang wallop

An interjection used for emphasis, especially to indicate loud noises. I was falling asleep on the couch when that framed photo fell off the wall and shattered, crash bang wallop!
See also: bang, crash, wallop

crash cart

The cart of medical equipment used when a patient "crashes" (experiences cardiac arrest). Get a crash cart in here, this patient needs immediate attention!
See also: cart, crash

crash dive

1. noun A sudden descent, typically in an emergency situation. The phrase is usually applied to submarines and airplanes. Engine two is out, prepare for a crash dive!
2. verb To make such a descent. My brain could barely comprehend that the our lives were in danger before the plane started to crash dive.
See also: crash, dive

crash down

1. Literally, to fall down or collapse, often noisily. When the tree crashed down in the woods, it woke us all up.
2. By extension, to result in disaster or lose all stability amidst drastic problems. When I lied on my resume to get my dream job, I really hoped it wouldn't all come crashing down around me—but, of course, it did. I've felt like my life is crashing down around me ever since my husband's sudden death.
See also: crash, down

crash into (someone or something)

To collide with someone or something, often violently. Another driver ignored a red light and crashed into us in the middle of the intersection. He didn't see the dining room table and crashed right into it.
See also: crash

crash out

To escape from some place. That criminal did crash out, but he was caught only a mile from the prison.
See also: crash, out

crash pad

A place where free accommodation is provided on a temporary basis. Because of our spare bedroom, our house has become something of a crash pad for visiting friends and family.
See also: crash, pad

crash the gate

To attend an event, such as a concert, sports match, or party, without being invited or paying to get in. That's way too much money to see them in concert, let's just crash the gate and see them on the sly! There's always a few who crash the gate at my party and end up causing trouble.
See also: crash, gate

crash the party

To attend a party without being invited. Come on, let's go crash the neighbors' party—I'm sure they won't mind us showing up. There's always someone who crashes the party and ends up causing trouble.
See also: crash, party

crash through (something)

To physically break through some thing or barrier, often violently. The driver crashed through the guardrail and ended up in oncoming traffic.
See also: crash, through

crash to the floor

To fall to the floor, usually noisily. The picture frame fell off the wall and crashed to the floor.
See also: crash, floor, to

crash together

Of two or more things, to strike each other violently or noisily. A noun or pronoun can be used between "crash" and "together." Our cars crashed together in the middle of the intersection when the other driver ran a red light. My job in the percussion section of the marching band is to crash the symbols together.
See also: crash, together

crash with (someone)

slang To sleep at someone else's residence. Since it's such a long drive, I'm just going to crash with my friend tonight and then head home tomorrow.
See also: crash

crashed

Drunk. Do you remember last night at all? You were really crashed!
See also: crash
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

crash and burn

 
1. Lit. [for a plane or car] to crash and burst into flames. The small plane crashed and burned just after it took off.
2. Fig. to fail spectacularly. Poor Chuck really crashed and burned when he made his presentation at the sales meeting.
See also: and, burn, crash

crash around

to move around in a noisy way Stop crashing around. I'm trying to study. The people upstairs were crashing around and I couldn't get any sleep.
See also: around, crash

crash course (in something)

a short and intense training course in something. I took a crash course in ballroom dancing so we wouldn't look stupid on the dance floor.
See also: course, crash

crash down

 (around someone or something) and crash down (about someone or something)
1. and crash in (on someone or something) Lit. [for something] to collapse on someone or something. The walls crashed in around the burning house. The branches of the tree crashed down on the roof. The old barn crashed down.
2. Fig. [for the structure and stability of one's life] to fall apart. Her whole life crashed down around her. Everything he was familiar with crashed down about him.
See also: crash, down

crash into someone or something

to bump or ram into someone or something accidentally or roughly. The student crashed into the door when it opened suddenly. The car crashed into a bus.
See also: crash

crash out (of some place)

to break out of some place, such as a prison. Max and Lefty crashed out of the state prison last week, but they were captured. They crashed out at midnight.
See also: crash, out

crash something together

to bring things together with great force, making a loud noise. Fred crashed the cymbals together and the sound could have wakened the dead. Don't crash those pans together. It drives me crazy.
See also: crash, together

crash through something

to break through something forcefully. The cows crashed right through the fence.
See also: crash, through

crash to the floor

to fall onto the floor and make a crashing sound. The tray of dishes crashed to the floor. Everything crashed to the floor and was broken.
See also: crash, floor, to

crash together

to ram or move together with great force. The two cars crashed together, making a loud noise. The ships crashed together, opening a gaping hole in the side of one of them.
See also: crash, together

crash with someone

Sl. to spend the night at someone's place. I don't need a hotel room. I can crash with Tom. There is no room for you to crash with me.
See also: crash
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

crash and burn

1. Fail utterly, as in Dale crashed and burned three times before passing the bar exam. This idiom alludes to a car or airplane that has crashed and caught fire. [Slang; 1970s]
2. In skateboarding and other sports, be taken out of competition by a collision, accident, or fall, as in Although she was favored to win the downhill race, she crashed and burned on her first run . [Slang; 1980s]
See also: and, burn, crash

crash course

A short, intensive training course, as in Daisy planned to take a crash course in cooking before she got married. [Colloquial; mid-1900s]
See also: course, crash

crash pad

A free, temporary lodging place, as in The company maintains several crash pads for employees from out-of-town divisions. This expression originally referred to a place affording runaways, drug addicts, and the like somewhere to crash in the sense of "sleep." In time it also was used more broadly, as in the example. [Slang; 1960s]
See also: crash, pad

crash the gate

Gain admittance, as to a party or concert, without being invited or without paying. For example, The concert was outdoors, but heavy security prevented anyone from crashing the gate. This term originally applied to persons getting through the gate at sports events without buying tickets. By the 1920s it was extended to being an uninvited guest at other gatherings and had given rise to the noun gatecrasher for one who did so. [Early 1900s]
See also: crash, gate
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

crash and burn

To crash and burn is to fail very badly. Stock markets don't crash and burn without warning. He will either go down in history as a very great president or he'll crash and burn. Note: This may be a reference to a plane crashing into the ground and bursting into flames.
See also: and, burn, crash
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

crash and burn

fail spectacularly. North American informal
1994 Hispanic But if you use Spanish, be careful not to crash and burn…the language is booby-trapped for the unwary PR professional.
See also: and, burn, crash
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ˌcrash and ˈburn

(American English, slang)
1 fail completely: She shot to fame, then crashed and burned.
2 fall asleep or collapse because you are very tired
See also: and, burn, crash
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

crash

1. tv. & in. to attend a party or other event uninvited. (see also crasher.) The boys who tried to crash also broke a window.
2. in. to spend the night. I crashed at a friend’s place in the city.
3. in. to sleep. If I don’t crash pretty soon, I’m going to die!
4. n. a place to sleep. I think I know of a crash for tonight.
5. in. [for a computer] to stop working. This thing crashes every time I hit a certain key.
6. n. a total failure of a computer. Crashes are to teach you to back up your data.
7. in. [for any electronic device] to fail. My stereo crashed, so I’ve been watching TV.
8. in. [for a securities market] to lose a significant portion of its value in a short time. The market crashed and scared the stuffing out of everybody.
9. n. a collapse of a securities market. After the crash, a lot of people swore off the market for good.
10. in. to pass out from drinking alcohol to excess. Let’s get Wilbur home before he crashes for good.

crash and burn

1. in. [for a young man] to fail brilliantly with a romance. (see also go down in flames.) It stands to reason that if Carole hadn’t shot me down, I wouldn’t have crashed and burned.
2. in. to fail spectacularly. I have to be prepared. I don’t want to crash and burn if I don’t have to.
See also: and, burn, crash

crash cart

n. a nickname for the hospital cart that carries equipment used to attempt to restore a heartbeat, such as a defibrilator. Get the crash cart to third west.
See also: cart, crash

crashed

1. mod. alcohol intoxicated. There were two crashed freshmen asleep on the lawn.
2. mod. raided by the police. (see also bust.) Our pad got crashed, and a lot of kids were arrested.
See also: crash
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

crash and burn

Slang
To fail utterly.
See also: and, burn, crash
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
FMCSA pointed out that small carriers that had "not preventable" crashes removed through the demonstration program have the largest reductions in their crash indicator percentiles.
'Nyanya-AyA recorded 16 crashes while Abuja-Keffi road recorded 12 crashes,'' he said.
The report also showed 11 per cent increase in crashes and 15 per cent increase in the number of persons injured.
* Distracted driving-related crashes are up to 49 percent more severe when they occur on a highway system.
The data contains detailed information regarding a series of crash attributes, such as "crash severity," "weather condition," and "crash type." To prepare the dataset used in the models, the original dataset was first divided into two groups: HR crashes and NHR crashes.
F Abdalla, "Linking roadway geometrics and real-time traffic characteristics to model daytime freeway crashes: generalized estimating equations for correlated data," Transportation Research Record, no.
Across the West Midlands there were 289 taxi crashes in 2014, 29 per cent higher than the 224 in 2013.
Roll-overs and pedestrian-related crashes have continuously been the highest types of accidents.
Driver characteristics showed that male drivers had a higher incidence of fatal crashes, due to increasing likelihoods of men to speed, act aggressively, or drive while impaired due to fatigue or substance abuse.
"For instance operating into mountainous regions in a third world country with limited navigation aids can be dangerous." Statistics 2003-2012 Worst Crash Rate LET 410 - 20 fatal crashes Ilyushin 72 - 17 fatal crashes Antonov AN-12 - 17 fatal crashes Twin Otter - 18 fatal crashes CASA 212 - 11 fatal crashes Best safety record with 0 fatal crashes are: Boeing 777 Boeing 717 Airbus A380 Airbus A340 Boeing 787 Wed, Jun 19, 2013 AirGuideOnline ISSN 1544-3760
Jiangxi also witnessed a decline of 3354 crashes, 1507 fatalities and 3910 injuries in 2011.
Fed Ex captain James 'JimBob' Slocum, who has previously survived three plane crashes - although we're unsure if he has won the Lottery - pilots the passenger jet, nicknamed 'Big Flo' (after crew member Leland 'Chip' Shanle's grandmother, Florence) on her last flight.
In the meantime, following is a chronology of major air crashes in Pakistan or involving Pakistani planes: May 20, 1965: A Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) Boeing 707 crashes on its inaugural flight while attempting to land at Cairo airport, killing 124 people.
"Peter had visited the RAF museum at Hendon and brought back a number of postcards detailing the aircraft crashes around the Beacons, so then I decided to trace the right locations to put a name to the wreckage.
Five people are injured or killed each day in Montana because of alcohol-related vehicle crashes. These accidents cost Montanans $621,000 per day and more than half a billion dollars per year in medical costs, lost wages, and lost productivity.