cranny

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any (old) nook or cranny

Any part or section of a given place, especially those that are hard to see or reach. I don't know where you put your keys, they could be in any nook or cranny. There are so many books in the library that you can find all sorts of interesting things in any old nook or cranny there.
See also: any, cranny, nook

every (old) nook and cranny

Every part or section of a given place, especially those that are hard to see or reach. Every nook or cranny of this house needs to be clean when Grandma comes to visit. There are so many books in the library that you can find all sorts of interesting things in every old nook or cranny there.
See also: and, cranny, every, nook

nook and cranny

Every possible place or part of something, down to the smallest ones. You need to clean every nook and cranny of this room before your grandmother gets here—it has to be spotless for her! I looked in every nook and cranny of the attic and couldn't find that box anywhere.
See also: and, cranny, nook

nook or cranny

Every possible place or part of something, down to the smallest ones. You need to clean every nook or cranny of this room before your grandmother gets here—it has to be spotless for her! I looked in every nook or cranny of the attic and couldn't find that box anywhere.
See also: cranny, nook
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

every nook and cranny

Fig. every small, out-of-the-way place or places where something can be hidden. We looked for the tickets in every nook and cranny. They were lost. There was no doubt. The decorator had placed flowers in every nook and cranny.
See also: and, cranny, every, nook
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

nook and cranny, every

Everywhere, as in I've searched for it in every nook and cranny, and I still can't find it. This metaphoric idiom pairs nook, which has meant "an out-of-the-way corner" since the mid-1300s, with cranny, which has meant "a crack or crevice" since about 1440. Neither noun is heard much other than in this idiom.
See also: and, every, nook
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

nooks and crannies

COMMON If you talk about the nooks and crannies of a place or object, you mean the smaller parts which are not normally noticed or are hard to reach. In the weeks before Christmas, we would search all the nooks and crannies of the house, trying to find our presents. This historic county town is packed with interesting nooks and crannies to explore. Note: You can also talk about every nook and cranny, meaning all the parts of a place or object. He seemed to know every nook and cranny of Venice. Note: A nook is a corner or recess in a wall, and a cranny is a narrow opening or gap.
See also: and, cranny, nook
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

every nook and cranny

every part or aspect of something.
See also: and, cranny, every, nook
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

(in) every ˌnook and ˈcranny

(informal) everywhere; (in) all parts of a place: I’ve looked in every nook and cranny but I can’t find it.She knows every nook and cranny of the city, so she’s the perfect guide.
A nook is a small hidden place and a cranny is a small hole. Both are old-fashioned words.
See also: and, cranny, every, nook
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

nook and cranny, every

Every place, all over. This expression combines nook, which has meant an out-of-the-way corner since the fourteenth century, and cranny, meaning a crack or crevice since the fifteenth century. Frederick Marryat used it in Japhet in Search of a Father (1836): “After examining every nook and cranny they could think of.”
See also: and, every, nook
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Monson, ed., The Crannied Wall: Women, Religion, and the Arts in Early Modern Europe, Studies in Early Medieval and Modern Civilization [Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1992]), and Robert L.
before we could know all about [the flower in the crannied wall] we should have to explore for ourselves the whole universe in which it grows.
The shell (which appears again in Maud), like the "flower in the crannied wall," refuses to open up to hermeneutics.
The crannied wall of the title is an apt metaphor for the contents of this collection.
These brief comments give an idea of the diversity of topics and approaches found in the ten essays of The Crannied Wall.
The Crannied Wall is a collection of ten essays originally presented at a conference, held in 1990 at Amherst College, that was sponsored jointly by the Departments of Religion and of Music.
Musical art transcended the boundaries and passed through crannied walls.
In "Flower in the Crannied Wall" Tennyson uses an infinite regress to dissolve relations and put the mind in a trance by showing how the flower's meaning is derivable only from the whole, endlessly retreating horizon of the world it is in: