cramp someone's style, to

cramp someone's style

Fig. to limit someone in some way. I hope this doesn't cramp your style, but could you please not hum while you work? To ask Bob to keep regular hours would really be cramping his style.
See also: cramp, style

cramp someone's style

Restrict or prevent someone from free action or expression, as in It really cramps my style when Mom hovers around me while I'm making dinner. Although in 1819 Charles Lamb complained that using different inks cramped his style of writing, the present sense of this colloquial term dates only from the early 1900s.
See also: cramp, style

cramp someone's style

If someone or something cramps your style, they prevent you from behaving freely in the way that you want. You two relax and celebrate on your own. You don't want us oldies cramping your style. Like more and more women with good jobs, independent spirits and high standards, she believes marriage would cramp her style.
See also: cramp, style

cramp someone's style

prevent a person from acting freely or naturally. informal
See also: cramp, style

cramp (one's) style

To restrict or prevent from free action or expression.
See also: cramp, style

cramp someone's style, to

To restrict someone’s natural actions; to prevent someone from doing his or her best. This seemingly up-to-date locution was first used by Charles Lamb in 1819. He was alluding to writer’s cramp, which constricted the natural flow of one’s pen. Figuratively the term came into use in the early twentieth century. W. Somerset Maugham used it in his early spy novel, Ashenden or: The British Agent (1927): “I can’t help thinking it would cramp your style.”
See also: cramp