cram

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cram for (something)

To study for a test shortly before it is to happen. You might have gotten a higher grade if you didn't cram for that exam at the last minute.
See also: cram

cram for a/the test

To study for a test shortly before it is scheduled to take place. You might have gotten a higher grade if you didn't cram for the test at the last minute.
See also: cram, test

cram for an/the exam

To study for a test shortly before it is scheduled to take place. You might have gotten a higher grade if you didn't cram for the exam at the last minute.
See also: cram, exam

cram in

1. To shove someone or something into something else (which often cannot contain or accommodate it). A noun or pronoun can be used between "cram" and "in." I tried to cram in another jacket, but it just wouldn't fit in my suitcase. Come on, we can cram you in too—make room, kids!
2. By extension, to force one to retain some information, especially large amount over a short space of time. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cram" and "in." I've been trying to cram this last chapter in for an hour, but my brain is totally fried. Don't just cram in these formulas, or you'll never remember them after the test.
See also: cram

cram into (something)

To shove something into something else (which often cannot contain or accommodate it). A noun or pronoun can be used between "cram" and "into." I tried to cram a jacket into my suitcase, but it just wouldn't fit. We were thrilled to reach our destination after being crammed into a tiny car with each other for hours.
See also: cram

cram together

1. To put two or more things into something, especially in a forceful or haphazard manner. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cram" and "together." Don't just cram all these things together in the box like that—you'll break something! He crammed together all of the cleaning supplies into a box under the sink.
2. To connect, construct, or assemble something very hastily, carelessly, or forcefully. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cram" and "together." No matter how hard I crammed together the two parts, they wouldn't connect the way they were supposed to. She decided to cram the pieces back together with some super glue and hope for the best.
3. To cause or direct two or more people to be very close together inside of something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cram" and "together." They crammed about 50 of us together in a cramped conference room with no air conditioning for the two-hour-long meeting. We somehow managed to cram together the entire team onto that tiny bus.
4. To schedule many things to happen within a relatively short period of time. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cram" and "together." They crammed together 20 different musical acts over the course of the festival. I usually don't like cramming so many activities together like that, but I only had two weeks, and I didn't know when I would have the opportunity to visit Japan again.
See also: cram, together

cram with (someone or something)

To fill something with more than it can reasonably hold or accommodate. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cram" and "with." Because this room is just totally crammed with people, we're moving everyone into the auditorium. I had crammed my suitcase with so much stuff that I couldn't get it to close.
See also: cram
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

cram for an examination

 and cram for a test
Fig. to study very hard for an exam. I have to go cram fora test now. If you would study during the school term, you would not have to cram.
See also: cram, examination

cram someone or something into something

 and cram someone or something in
to stuff or crush someone or something into something. Can you really cram seven kids into that car? He crammed in his clothes and closed the drawer.
See also: cram

cram someone or something with someone or something

to fill someone or something by stuffing with someone or something. You won't be happy till you cram all of us with cake and ice cream. He crammed his drawer with his socks.
See also: cram
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cram

in. to study hard at the last minute for a test. If you would study all the time, you wouldn’t need to cram.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
On the one hand, there is reason to think that procrastination and cramming should be associated with a reduced likelihood of flow experience.
On the other hand, one of the most attractive aspects of cramming may be that it promotes flow-like experiences.
These students cycle through a pattern of calculated procrastination, preparatory anxiety, climactic cramming, nick-of-time decision-making, and finally a victory to be celebrated.
In addition to its possible flow-like characteristics, the cramming experience is likely to be reinforcing to the extent that it is associated with academic (and other forms of) success.
One's skills at cramming (e.g., being able to stay awake and alert, managing one's limited time, memorizing and integrating large amounts of material) presumably remain relatively constant.
The present study was designed to test this possibility by examining the relationship between cramming and flow.
They volunteered for the study by placing their names on a sign-up sheet which described the study as dealing with academic cramming and procrastination.
In other words, make the following ratings by considering your overall study habits, across all of your courses." First, participants provided their own definition of academic cramming. We then provided them with R.
The cramming procedure consisted of the administration of (a) instructions and textbook reading material, (b) a multiple-choice test on this material, (c) a brief questionnaire about the study materials and test, and (d) an assessment of flow experienced during the cramming and testing.
The reading material used in the cramming task came from a popular text on research methods in psychology (Bordens & Abbott, 1999a).
Try to devote your full attention to "cramming" this material and also try to do as well as you can on the test.
Immediately after the test, participants used 5-point Liken scales (1 = not at all, 2 = a little bit, 3 = moderately, 4 = a fair bit, 5 = very much) to rate the extent to which they had previously been exposed to the material, thought the material was difficult, and thought the experiment was similar to an actual cramming session.
As suggested by these data, students reported cramming more often during the current semester than they preferred to cram, t(160) = 15.32, p < .001.
For example, frequency of cramming during the current semester was positively correlated with general preference for cramming, r(159) = .43, p< .001, cramming by choice, r(159) = .54, p< .001, cramming by necessity, r(159) = .21, p < .01, and last-minute cramming, r(159) = .42, p < .001.
For these very strong scientific reasons, one can logically conclude that cramming is termite that is licking out brain's skills of your up-coming generations, he said.