crack house

(redirected from crackhouses)

crack house

A building, often one that is run-down, where crack and other drugs are commonly sold and used. I'd steer clear of that place on the corner—it really looks like a crack house.
See also: crack, house
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

crack house

n. a house or dwelling where crack (sense 7) is sold and used. (Drugs.) In one dilapidated neighborhood, there is a crack house on every block.
See also: crack, house
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
UNRAIDED crackhouses, car crime and a lack of resources are pushing police beyond their limits, a meeting has heard.
The organisation have closed down crackhouses, evicted neighbours from hell and helped target truanting teenagers on Wirral.
This imagery was reinforced nightly as news broadcasts featured action clips of narcotics squads raiding crackhouses, busting down doors, and carting off young black and Hispanic men in chains."
On Heidelberg Street, 54-year-old Tyree Guyton uses the trash from abandoned crackhouses to create a riot of street art.
In April she was ordered to leave her home in Langley Park, near Consett, under a police blitz on so-called crackhouses.
I would always tell Marc that if it wasn't for Puchi, Hector would have died a long time ago because she pulled him out of the crackhouses.
Officers ( including specialists drugs squad officers ( were targeting suspected crackhouses in the Dewsbury area to arrest people dealing in hard drugs such as crack cocaine It is part of a week-long blitz in the Dewsbury area to coincide with an anti-drugs campaign called Tackling Drugs Changing Lives.
Yesterday, Cardiff Crown Court heard how Denver Bernard, 28, Paul West, 27, Shamar Shirley, 18, and Kemar Campbell, 19, worked shift patterns from so-called crackhouses in Inchmarnock Street, Splott, and Amherst Street, Grangetown, during October and November last year.
With funding for his work from the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, the Russell Sage Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, the Ford Foundation, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, and the United States Bureau of the Census, Bourgois lived in el barrio for several years, befriending two dozen street dealers and their families, spending, he says, "hundreds of nights on the street and in crackhouses observing dealers and addicts" and regularly tape-recording their life histories and conversations [13].
Federal prosecutors have also used the "Crackhouse Law" to prosecute nightclub promoters, arguing that clubs that host what are called "rave" Ecstasy parties, in essence, function as crackhouses.
The Reducing Americans' Vulnerability to Ecstasy (RAVE) Act of 2002 would broaden a federal law aimed at crackhouses so it can he used more easily against raves.
Without a consistent supply, there could be no crackhouses, opium dens, coffee houses or heroin shooting galleries.
Crack users in most ethnographic studies buy small, prepackaged quantities, often on public streets or in busy crackhouses (for example, Bourgois 1995; Ratner 1993; Inciardi et al.
It was a period in which warped phrases like the "yellow peril" became popular, in which opium dens and the fear of opium dens, like crackhouses today, were used to whip up an anti-Asian, anti-Chinese sentiment.