cover the same ground

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cover the same ground

To discuss or address something that has already been discussed or examined. I don't know why we keep having meetings when all we do is cover the same ground every week.
See also: cover, ground, same
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

cover the same ground

or

go over the same ground

If something such as a conversation, a piece of writing or a course covers the same ground or goes over the same ground, it deals with the same subjects or the same part of a subject that has already been dealt with. As the titles of these two books imply, they cover much the same ground. You continue to think and wonder about it, going over the same ground in your mind, again and again.
See also: cover, ground, same
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
If you do not have a book in your school library giving an overview of the war then this book is a good choice but there are plenty of other books covering the same ground.
Covering the same ground as many speculative fiction attempts, Idlewild explores humankind's self-destructive tendencies while at the same time marveling at its ability to save itself and continue its race down the corridors of time and evolution.
Viking Penguin blamed the redundancy on the company having too many editors covering the same ground. Hollis was responsible for acquiring a novel by 'This Diary will Change Your Life 2004' creators Stephen Amidon and Benrick Ltd.
He circled it 220 times, covering the same ground as a 26-mile marathon.
Essentially covering the same ground as the promotional film, originally issued to coincide with the album's release (and an early example of what would later be called the longform music video) it illustrates Lennon's strict studio routine, backstage bickering and a series of star turns from, among others George Harrison, Andy Warhol and Jack Nicholson.
Covering the same ground in her 1989 autobiography, Holding On to the Air, she had antagonized some reviewers for discussing Balanchine in a manner they had found arrogant, and even a bit brattish.