cousin


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Related to cousin: second cousin, Cousin marriage

country cousin

Someone unknowledgeable, unsophisticated, or naïve about the niceties and complexities of an urban environment, especially in a humorous or quaint capacity. I always try to lend a hand to the poor country cousins who invariably stand bewildered by the skyscrapers and the incredible noise of traffic. I thought I was savvy enough to live in New York City, but I soon felt like the country cousin.
See also: country, cousin

everybody and his cousin

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and his cousin is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, cousin, everybody

everyone and his cousin

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everyone and his cousin is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, cousin, everyone

first cousin

Someone or something that bears a close relation or resemblance to another person or thing. Their newest model of car, though spiffed up, remains a first cousin to their last design. In terms of artistic vision, the young director is clearly a first cousin to the likes of Alfred Hitchcock.
See also: cousin, first

kissing cousin

1. Any cousin who is not a first cousin. Brad and Tom look a lot alike, but they are not that closely related—they're kissing cousins.
2. A friend or relative who is close enough to be greeted with a kiss. Lisa and Kelly have been such close friends for so long that they're kissing cousins.
See also: cousin, kiss

kissing cousins

relatives who know one another well enough to kiss when they meet. Joe and I are kissing cousins, though we ain't seen one another since we was kids. Technically, we're second cousins once removed, but I just say we're kissing cousins.
See also: cousin, kiss

think someone hung the moon (and stars)

 and think someone is God's own cousin
Rur. to think someone is perfect. Joe won't listen to any complaints about Mary. He thinks she hung the moon and stars. Jim is awful stuck-up. He thinks he's God's own cousin.
See also: hung, moon, think

What's buzzin'?

 and What's buzzin' cousin?
Sl. What's happening? Hey, chum! What's buzzin' cousin? What's buzzin' around here?

country cousin

One whose lack of sophistication or rural ways may amuse or embarrass city dwellers. For example, The sightseeing guide geared his tour toward country cousins who had never been to a large city before . This term, which literally means "a cousin who lives in the country," has been used in this figurative way since the second half of the 1700s, although the idea is much older (such persons were stock figures of fun in Restoration comedies of the late 1600s and early 1700s).
See also: country, cousin

first cousin

A close relation or resemblance to someone or something, as in This new machine is a first cousin to the previous model. The figurative use of cousin, which literally means "the child of one's aunt or uncle," dates from the 1300s.
See also: cousin, first

kissing cousins

Two or more things that are closely akin or very similar. For example, They may be made by different manufacturers, but these two cars are kissing cousins. This metaphoric term alludes to a distant relative who is well known enough to be greeted with a kiss. [c. 1930]
See also: cousin, kiss

second cousin

Something that is related or similar but not quite the same, as in This beef stew is second cousin to boeuf bourguignon. This expression transfers the literal sense of second cousin-that is, the child of the first cousin of one's mother or father-a usage dating from the mid-1600s.
See also: cousin, second

a country ˈbumpkin/ˈcousin

(informal, usually disapproving) a person from the countryside who is not used to towns or cities and seems stupid: He felt a real country bumpkin, sitting in that expensive restaurant, not knowing which cutlery to use.
See also: bumpkin, country, cousin

What’s buzzin’ (cousin)?

interrog. What’s happening? Hey, chum! What’s buzzin’ cousin?
References in classic literature ?
We had our expected good dinner at Cousin Mattie's--may it be counted unto her for righteousness.
Dear mama, only think, my cousin cannot put the map of Europe together-- or my cousin cannot tell the principal rivers in Russia-- or, she never heard of Asia Minor--or she does not know the difference between water-colours and crayons
Very true indeed, my dears, but you are blessed with wonderful memories, and your poor cousin has probably none at all.
Lapsing then out of date and being considered to bore mankind by her vocal performances in the Spanish language, she retired to Bath, where she lives slenderly on an annual present from Sir Leicester and whence she makes occasional resurrections in the country houses of her cousins.
The rest of the cousins are ladies and gentlemen of various ages and capacities, the major part amiable and sensible and likely to have done well enough in life if they could have overcome their cousinship; as it is, they are almost all a little worsted by it, and lounge in purposeless and listless paths, and seem to be quite as much at a loss how to dispose of themselves as anybody else can be how to dispose of them.
I am sorry to record it of old Lobbs, but I think he would have struck the cousin, if his pretty daughter, with her bright eyes swimming in tears, had not clung to his arm.
Old Lobbs turned his head away, as if to avoid being persuaded by them, when, as fortune would have it, he encountered the face of the wicked little cousin, who, half afraid for her brother, and half laughing at Nathaniel Pipkin, presented as bewitching an expression of countenance, with a touch of slyness in it, too, as any man, old or young, need look upon.
The cousin and Sancho Panza listened with deep attention to the words of Don Quixote, who uttered them as though with immense pain he drew them up from his very bowels.
Standing there and looking round with happy eyes, I forgot the existence of the cousins.
Newland made no answer, and after a moment his mother ventured: "I was going to put on my bonnet and ask you to take me to see cousin Louisa for a moment before dinner.
My dear cousin," asked she, overcoming an indefinable reluctance, "is there not some one in the room with us?
murmured Porthos to himself, and then said aloud, "Thank you, my cousin, I am no longer hungry.
Marmaduke did not much like the associates of Richard in this business; still he knew them to be cunning and ready expedients; and as there was certainly something mysterious, not only in the connection between the old hunters and Edwards, but in what his cousin had just related, he began to revolve the subject in his own mind with more care.
Sophia, who was yielding to an excess, when she could neither laugh nor reason her cousin out of these apprehensions, at last gave way to them.
Captain Bonneville and his companions had pursued their journey a considerable distance down the course of Snake River, when the old chief halted on the bank, and dismounting, recommended that they should turn their horses loose to graze, while he summoned a cousin of his from a group of lodges on the opposite side of the stream.