cousin


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Related to cousin: second cousin, Cousin marriage

country cousin

Someone unknowledgeable, unsophisticated, or naïve about the niceties and complexities of an urban environment, especially in a humorous or quaint capacity. I always try to lend a hand to the poor country cousins who invariably stand bewildered by the skyscrapers and the incredible noise of traffic. I thought I was savvy enough to live in New York City, but I soon felt like the country cousin.
See also: country, cousin

everybody and his cousin

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and his cousin is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, cousin, everybody

everyone and his cousin

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everyone and his cousin is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, cousin, everyone

first cousin

Someone or something that bears a close relation or resemblance to another person or thing. Their newest model of car, though spiffed up, remains a first cousin to their last design. In terms of artistic vision, the young director is clearly a first cousin to the likes of Alfred Hitchcock.
See also: cousin, first

kissing cousin

1. Any cousin who is not a first cousin. Brad and Tom look a lot alike, but they are not that closely related—they're kissing cousins.
2. A friend or relative who is close enough to be greeted with a kiss. Lisa and Kelly have been such close friends for so long that they're kissing cousins.
See also: cousin, kiss

second cousin

Slightly similar or related to something else, while being noticeably different or unique. Usually followed by "to" or "of (something)." It's clear that, from design, power, and aesthetic, their new sports car is second cousin to the classic muscle cars of the 1950s.
See also: cousin, second

kissing cousins

relatives who know one another well enough to kiss when they meet. Joe and I are kissing cousins, though we ain't seen one another since we was kids. Technically, we're second cousins once removed, but I just say we're kissing cousins.
See also: cousin, kiss

think someone hung the moon (and stars)

 and think someone is God's own cousin
Rur. to think someone is perfect. Joe won't listen to any complaints about Mary. He thinks she hung the moon and stars. Jim is awful stuck-up. He thinks he's God's own cousin.
See also: hung, moon, think

What's buzzin'?

 and What's buzzin' cousin?
Sl. What's happening? Hey, chum! What's buzzin' cousin? What's buzzin' around here?

country cousin

One whose lack of sophistication or rural ways may amuse or embarrass city dwellers. For example, The sightseeing guide geared his tour toward country cousins who had never been to a large city before . This term, which literally means "a cousin who lives in the country," has been used in this figurative way since the second half of the 1700s, although the idea is much older (such persons were stock figures of fun in Restoration comedies of the late 1600s and early 1700s).
See also: country, cousin

first cousin

A close relation or resemblance to someone or something, as in This new machine is a first cousin to the previous model. The figurative use of cousin, which literally means "the child of one's aunt or uncle," dates from the 1300s.
See also: cousin, first

kissing cousins

Two or more things that are closely akin or very similar. For example, They may be made by different manufacturers, but these two cars are kissing cousins. This metaphoric term alludes to a distant relative who is well known enough to be greeted with a kiss. [c. 1930]
See also: cousin, kiss

second cousin

Something that is related or similar but not quite the same, as in This beef stew is second cousin to boeuf bourguignon. This expression transfers the literal sense of second cousin-that is, the child of the first cousin of one's mother or father-a usage dating from the mid-1600s.
See also: cousin, second

a country ˈbumpkin/ˈcousin

(informal, usually disapproving) a person from the countryside who is not used to towns or cities and seems stupid: He felt a real country bumpkin, sitting in that expensive restaurant, not knowing which cutlery to use.
See also: bumpkin, country, cousin

What’s buzzin’ (cousin)?

interrog. What’s happening? Hey, chum! What’s buzzin’ cousin?

country cousin

A visiting unsophisticated relative or friend whose naiveté or rough manners embarrass the host. Such a person became a stock figure of fun in Restoration comedies (of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries). The precise term was current by the second half of the eighteenth century and a cliché by the mid-nineteenth century. Anthony Trollope’s son’s reminiscences (Thomas Adolphus Trollope, What I Remember, 1887) included, “One of the sights of London for country cousins was to see the mails starting.” The term is heard less often today.
See also: country, cousin
References in classic literature ?
To come in the capacity of a cousin, and seat himself every day at a good table; to smooth the yellow, wrinkled brow of the old procurator; to pluck the clerks a little by teaching them BASSETTE, PASSE-DIX, and LANSQUENET, in their utmost nicety, and winning from them, by way of fee for the lesson he would give them in an hour, their savings of a month--all this was enormously delightful to Porthos.
The cousin was received with resignation, that was all.
The Judge did not reply, but his brow had contracted, with a thoughtfulness that he always wore when much interested, and his eyes rested on his cousin in expectation of hearing more.
Since the snow has been off, more especially after the frosts got out of the ground, we have kept a watchful eye on the gentle man, in which we have found Jotham useful.” Marmaduke did not much like the associates of Richard in this business; still he knew them to be cunning and ready expedients; and as there was certainly something mysterious, not only in the connection between the old hunters and Edwards, but in what his cousin had just related, he began to revolve the subject in his own mind with more care.
After some time, the countenance of the-old chief again cleared up, and he fell into repeated conferences, in an under tone, with his cousin, which ended in the departure of the latter, who, applying the lash to his horse, dashed forward and was soon out of sight.
"Oh, Dan, Cousin Mattie and her sisters-in-law are just as nice and kind as they can be," reproached Cecily.
She felt that she had a friend, and the kindness of her cousin Edmund gave her better spirits with everybody else.
Lapsing then out of date and being considered to bore mankind by her vocal performances in the Spanish language, she retired to Bath, where she lives slenderly on an annual present from Sir Leicester and whence she makes occasional resurrections in the country houses of her cousins. She has an extensive acquaintance at Bath among appalling old gentlemen with thin legs and nankeen trousers, and is of high standing in that dreary city.
'It is by no means improbable that old Lobbs would have carried his threat into execution, in the excess of his rage, if his arm had not been stayed by a very unexpected apparition: to wit, the male cousin, who, stepping out of his closet, and walking up to old Lobbs, said--
"You are right, friend," said the cousin; and said Don Quixote, "Sancho, that question and answer are not thine own; thou hast heard them from some one else."
The mist hid me, and the carriage, no doubt full of cousins, drove on in the direction of the house; but what an absurd position I was in!
She had hoped better things from their high ideas of their own situation in life, and was reduced to form a wish which she had never foreseen; a wish that they had more pride; for "our cousins Lady Dalrymple and Miss Carteret;" "our cousins, the Dalrymples," sounded in her ears all day long.
"You know cousin Henry asked her to please you: he persuaded cousin Louisa.
"But here are Laurence, and Charley, and I," cried cousin Clara, who was twice as old as little Alice.
"I did not know that my cousin Hepzibah's garden was under another person's care."