cough

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Related to coughs: dry coughs

cough (one's) head off

To cough intensely, as from an illness. Natalie has still been coughing her head off, so I don't think the antibiotic you gave her has helped.
See also: cough, head, off

cough it up

slang To give something to someone, often after a period of evasion. Often used as an imperative. If you owe Joey money, his thugs will eventually make you cough it up. Cough it up—show us what you're looking at!
See also: cough, up

cough out

To speak while coughing. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cough" and "out." Although she tried to cough out her presentation, she ultimately had to stop and drink a glass of water.
See also: cough, out

cough up

1. To expel something through coughing. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cough" and "up." While I was sick, I found myself constantly coughing up phlegm. The child was able to cough up the bit of food he was choking on, thank goodness.
2. To vomit. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cough" and "up." When I had food poisoning, I felt like I coughed up everything I'd ever eaten in my life.
3. slang To divulge something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cough" and "up." I'm sure he'll cough up the name of his accomplice once we send in our toughest investigator.
4. slang To give something to someone, often after a period of evasion. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cough" and "up." Joey's thugs cornered me and made me cough up the money I owed them. There wasn't even that much pressure on him when he coughed up the basketball!
5. slang To surrender the lead in a game or competition. A noun or pronoun can be used between "cough" and "up." With their shaky defense, I wouldn't be surprised if they coughed up this 10-point lead.
See also: cough, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

cough one's head off

Fig. to cough long and hard. (See also laugh one's head off.) I had the flu. I nearly coughed my head off for two days.
See also: cough, head, off

cough something out

to say something while coughing. He coughed the words out, but no one could understand him. He coughed out the name of his assailant.
See also: cough, out

cough something up

 
1. to get something out of the body by coughing. She coughed some matter up and took some more medicine. She coughed up phlegm all night.
2. Euph. to vomit something. The dog coughed the rabbit up. The dog coughed up the food it had eaten.
3. Sl. to produce or present something, such as an amount of money. You will cough the money up, won't you? You had better cough up what you owe me, if you know what's good for you.
See also: cough, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cough up

1. Hand over or relinquish, especially money; pay up. For example, It's time the delinquent members coughed up their dues. [Slang; late 1800s]
2. Confess or divulge, as in Pretty soon she'd cough up the whole story about last night. This idiom transfers the act of vomiting to telling the entire truth. [Slang; late 1800s]
See also: cough, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cough up

v.
1. To force something from the throat or lungs and out of the mouth by coughing: After years of smoking, he started coughing up blood. The medicine loosened the phlegm so she could cough it up.
2. Slang To pay or hand over something, as money, often reluctantly: Cough up the money or you're going to jail. I know you're short on the rent money, but you'll have to cough it up.
3. Slang To confess or disclose something: When the police arrived, we coughed up the details of the incident. When the lawyers threatened me for not disclosing the tax returns, I coughed them up.
See also: cough, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Cough it up!

tv. to give something—typically money—to someone, especially if done unwillingly. You owe me twenty bucks. Cough it up!
See also: cough

cough something up

tv. to produce something (which someone has requested), usually money. Cough up what you owe me!
See also: cough, something, up
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in classic literature ?
"I am sure I am much obliged to you for your good opinion," returns the stationer with his cough of modesty, "but--"
Birring, "Cough frequency monitors: can they discriminate patient from environmental coughs?," Journal of Thoracic Disease, vol.
Ninety sec- onds after fentanyl injection, based on the number of coughs observed, cough severity was graded as mild (1-2), moderate (3-5), or severe (>5) and vital parameters were recorded by an independent observer.
LIKE headaches, sore throats and runny noses, coughs are extremely common and most of the time, nothing to really worry about.
ENPNewswire-August 30, 2019--Taiho Pharmaceutical Releases Second Product under the Pitas Brand Pitas Cough Troche for Coughs and Phlegm, a Sticker-type Troche Helpful in Business Meetings
By combining it with honey, which is a natural cough suppressant, and making a tea out of it, you can help get rid of wet coughs sooner than later.
Dry coughs are usually just a sign of something irritating the airways and aren't spreadable.
Oftentimes, coughs due to colds, allergies, and sinus infections are treated with a number of over-the-counter medicines.
Dr Alexandra Phelan explains: "Most coughs in children are simple viral infections requiring no treatment.
She is part of a study at atManchester University NHS Foundation Trust (MFT)that aims to find out more about a new drug called MK-7264 that could help chronic coughs.
The researchers initiated treatment with sustained theophylline, tiotropium, and erythromycin, but there was no change in cough frequency, cough-specific quality of life, asthma control, or number of capsaicin-induced coughs at six-month follow-up.
No peer-reviewed journal, however, would publish the paper because her findings challenge the assumption that chronic coughs are asthma related.
Almost all coughs are from upper respiratory infections (that's fancy talk for common, ordinary colds caused by common, ordinary viruses).