cotton (on)to (someone or something)

(redirected from cottoning onto)

cotton (on)to (someone or something)

1. To like someone or something; to view someone or something favorably. It takes me a while to cotton to new people—I have to get to know them first. After we explained our plan again, the rest of the group seemed to cotton onto it.
2. To begin to understand something. Thanks for explaining that concept to me—I think I'm cottoning onto it now.
See also: cotton

cotton (on)to someone or something

Rur. to begin to like or agree to someone or something quickly. She began to cotton to Fred, despite his country ways. She cottoned onto Jane's way of thinking.
See also: cotton

cotton to

1. Take a liking to, get along with, as in This dog doesn't cotton to strangers. Although this verbal phrase comes from the noun for the fabric, the semantic connection between these parts of speech is unclear. [Early 1800s]
2. Also, cotton on to. Come to understand, grasp, as in She didn't really cotton on to what I was saying. [Colloquial; early 1900s]
See also: cotton

cotton onto

v.
To come to understand something: I finally cottoned onto the new method.
See also: cotton

cotton to

v.
1. To take a liking to someone or something: That dog doesn't cotton to strangers.
2. To come to understand something: I finally cottoned to the new computer system.
See also: cotton
References in periodicals archive ?
THE BIGGEST SURPRISE WAS NO SURPRISE The FA Cup was a disappointment this week in terms of surprises but maybe that's because clubs are cottoning onto playing their best players.
Now they're worth PS5-600 and it's only now that everyone's cottoning onto it.
IT'S unbelievable that only at this very late stage are people cottoning onto the idea that the World Cup 2022 bid was one of the most unashamedly unfair processes in football.
People are finally cottoning onto just how wonderfully funny this politically-incorrect cartoon is.
The sector seems to be cottoning onto the fact that to increase market share, you need to broaden your horizons.
BACK in 2008, forward-thinking Mark Easby was cottoning onto the power of Twitter before many other people had even heard of it.