cost (someone) dearly

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cost (someone) dearly

To cause dire, harmful, or problematic consequences for someone, especially regarding a foolish action or a mistake. Drinking all night before his final exams is going to cost him dearly. That late penalty could cost them dearly, as it now puts their opponents within range to tie the game.
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References in periodicals archive ?
You can revisit details in future years to help people see how certain decisions paid off well or cost dearly.
The project, launched by Advantage West Midlands and the Government body WRAP (Waste and Resources Action Programme) is designed to steer businesses away from putting waste into landfill, which can cost dearly.
Lama cautioned, if steps were not taken with speed for a peaceful world, the advantages of modern technology might cost dearly to the humanity.
After a five-year conflict that cost dearly in blood and treasure, the Iraqi leader's elation is a feeling most Americans certainly share.
Defensive mistakes against Japan cost dearly while a new look team against Qatar energised Bahrain's campaign and ensured a point.
In one of the most dramatic finishes for many years, Davis headed into a damp final stage without the advantage of four-wheel drive, knowing the slightest of errors would cost dearly.
It was their inability to overcome such setbacks that cost dearly.
Instead, the decision makers allowed the strictly limited personnel transport to advance into full production and fielding "as is"--and this oversight will cost dearly.
But Strachan admitted his side's failure to break down a resilient Dunfermline had cost dearly.
If you're refused finance, you can find out why, but don't be tempted to use disreputable lenders just because they'll take you -- it'll cost dearly in the long run.
It was scant reward for Rovers who had enjoyed copious amounts of pressure but the lack of a cutting edge up front cost dearly.
2) Fines levied by government agencies: As a number of nursing homes have learned, noncompliance with regulations related to cleanliness, safety and infection control can cost dearly.
Failure to do so can cost dearly, as those who took a good idea (for example, branch agents) and executed it poorly (for example, as a branch franchise set-up) have learned.