cosleep

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cosleep

Of a parent, to sleep in the same bed or room as one or more of their small or infant children. We're going to try cosleeping once the baby is born.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Morning protocols showed significantly increased subjective sleep duration when cosleeping (Table 1 and Figure 1).
She said: "The new guidance recommends that parents should be informed of the statistical association between cosleeping and SIDS, but does not tell parents to never sleep with their babies.
We should all be breastfeeding, cosleeping and entirely giving ourselves over to our children all the time.
In this study 'cosleeping' was defined to include any adult and baby sleeping together on a bed or a sofa.
"There has been a quadrupling of infant deaths due to suffocation and entrapment, and a lot of this is attributable to inappropriate bedding and to cosleeping" with parents.
cosleeping. Authors and parents Michael Chabon and Neal Pollack have written about agonizing over the decision.
Hippie mothers engaged in midwifery, breastfeeding, family cosleeping, and home schooling--practices now embraced by millions of parents.
A spokeswoman for the Sudden Infant Death Register in Ireland welcomed the findings but warned cosleeping must be dealt with carefully.
Despite a dramatic drop in the rate of cot death in the UK since the early 1990s, experts are advising parents to avoid dangerous cosleeping arrangements in order to help reduce deaths even further.
"Cosleeping" makes particular sense for single mothers because usually there is no one else already present in bed at night.
It involves concepts such as breastfeeding on demand, cosleeping, babywearing, respect and trust, listening to your baby, trusting your instincts and other principles that create strong, healthy emotional bonds between children and their parents.
Bed sharing is defined as an infant's sleeping with others in an adult bed or nontraditional surface (cosleeping involves the infant sleeping in his or her own space, but adjacent to the parent or caregiver).
Along with informed and informative contributions by William Sears, Meredith Small, and Peter Fleming, "Sleeping With Your Baby: A Parent's Guide to Cosleeping" by James J.
This approach is distinct from the common practice, sometimes called "reactive cosleeping," where a parent responds to a child's insistence on not sleeping alone by sleeping in the same room with the child (sometimes for years!) because this approach limits the parental presence to one week.
(3,7,8) Some descriptive studies suggest potential benefits of cosleeping, such as improved breastfeeding and maternal-infant bonding, but these benefits have not been quantified.