cosleep

cosleep

Of a parent, to sleep in the same bed or room as one or more of their small or infant children. We're going to try cosleeping once the baby is born.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the high prevalence of cosleep, polysomnographic studies on cosleeping couples are rare.
Understanding cosleep of couples more deeply and addressing its interactive dimension seem important for two reasons.
Here, we present an explorative pilot study which combines for the first time simultaneous polysomnography, analysis of established sleep measures, and cross recurrence quantification analysis to address the unique features of cosleep in couples.
The order of sleep modes (individual sleep in separate rooms and cosleep in juxtaposed single beds) was counterbalanced, so that all couples slept in both sleep modes.
We don't know what don't know what W causes these babies to die suddenly, but we do know that if a parent smokes, drinks alcohol or takes drugs then SIDS is potentially more likely to occur if they then cosleep with their infant.
We don't know what causes these babies to die suddenly, but we do know that if a parent smokes, drinks alcohol or takes drugs then SIDS is potentially more likely to occur if they then cosleep with their infant.
NICHHD has not identified any scientific proof that SIDS is reduced when adults and children cosleep. In fact, bed sharing may be unsafe for a baby.
The consent form is signed by the parent acknowledging they have been provided information on the policy guidelines of bed sharing and understand there are risks if they choose to cosleep with their infant.
Lastly, children are less likely to need transitional objects (e.g., "security" blankets, teddy bears) as psychological substitutes for human contact when parents cosleep and have frequent daytime contacts (Anders & Taylor, 1994).
Families are more likely to cosleep when parents are single, when they are of low socioeconomic status, when they are less educated, and when they are "'nonconventional," she said.
Parents cosleep with their kids for one of two reasons, she said.
Owens, the proportion of children who cosleep was found to increase steadily from 1 in 100 at 3 months of age to more than one-third by 4 years, when it then begins to decline again (Pediatrics 2005;115:233-40).
Q: Won't my child be emotionally dependent if we cosleep?
Q: Do you believe that all parents should cosleep with their babies?
Children of the younger mothers were significantly more likely to cosleep with their mothers than were those of older mothers (47% vs.