corrupt

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Related to corruptness: debauched

power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely

The more powerful one is, the more unscrupulous one becomes. A: "I never should have appointed him head of the committee." B: "You need to call him in for a meeting before he thinks that he can do whatever he wants. Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely."

absolute power corrupts absolutely

One who holds unchecked power or authority is likely to become corrupt or abuse one's position. This phrase is usually attributed to 19th-century historian Lord Acton. He really started abusing the authority of his office when he was promoted to CEO. Absolute power corrupts absolutely.

Absolute power corrupts absolutely.

Prov. One who has total authority is very likely to abuse his position. (This phrase was used by the British historian Lord Acton: "Power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely.") We thought that Johnson would be a responsible mayor, but within a year of taking office, he was as bad as all the rest. Absolute power corrupts absolutely.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the Enron, Tyco and WorldCom cases might support the corruptness theory, in reality, the increase in lawsuits goes back to 1999, beginning with the dot-com collapse.
The anonymous author of Lazarillo makes his narrator (who entertains readers while infecting them with his diseased opinions and values) the most persuasive evidence of the corruptness of the world, while also contradicting his character by exemplifying in his art positive valuesuincluding courage and disinterested critical analysis--that are incompatible with his creature's bottomless cynicism.
A similar rhetoric was used by European colonizers of Native American soil, who evoked the corruptness of Indian languages to justify the displacement and eventual destruction of native lives:
It is the morally based subcategory of the third category, which in general terms might be presented as the poet's criticism of imperial materialism and corruptness, that is at present of the greatest interest to me.
Chulalongkorn's perception of the corruptness of Lao religion is in "Phraratchadamrat kae Phrasong nai kan thi cha truat sorp Phratraipitok, pi chuat, 2431" [Royal speech to the Sangha on the recension of the Tripitaka, Year of the Rat, 1888] in Prayut, Maharatchakawi, p.
I thought it was very witty - as you might expect from Oscar Wilde - with a frighteningly up-to-date plot based on political corruptness and social dramas.
Total human corruptness necessitated a dramatic form of divine redemption, which each individual had to experience to know that he was saved.
McWhorter, who decried the religious hypocrisy and political corruptness that the government's settlement pressures engendered.
Out of the corruptness and decadence of the old, a new world was being born.
"Twenty years ago, Bobby and I set out to write a highly specific piece about a certain corruptness that we had observed in the American legal system.
And he criticized Arafat's administration of the West Bank and Gaza, denouncing him for corruptness and for brutality, for acting as an Israeli gendarme, for selling Palestinians short.
While Brian Mulroney whinges and whines about the tremendous damage that has been done to his honour by the suggestion that he would take a bribe, the papers are full of stories concerning the moral corruptness of his entire entourage.
Self-censorship became a mark of distinction from the moral corruptness of the nobility long before Freud introduced the super-ego and the unconscious as agents of control in a society where the nobility had long lost its commanding position.
Precedence, the corruptness of the early fragment, and later complete but modified versions of his epic make it difficult to assess Eilhart's importance.
He now has to deal with the corruptness and shortcomings of the Church as well as face the Protestant world, to which his family and old friends still belong.