correct

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a dead clock is correct twice a day

Even people who are usually wrong can be right sometimes, even if just by accident. From the idea that the stationary hands of a broken clock will still display the correct time at two points during the 24-hour cycle. I know you're sick of Gran's lectures and think she's out of touch, but you can learn a lot from her. Just keep in mind that even a dead clock is correct twice a day! A: "You know how I feel about the mayor, but even I think he's right this time." B: "Even a dead clock is correct twice a day."
See also: clock, correct, dead, twice

all correct

1. Indeed. All correct—see you then.
2. In good order. Our accountant took a look at the accounts and proclaimed them all correct.
See also: all, correct

all present and correct

All people or things being tallied are present, or their location or status is known or has been considered. Primarily heard in UK. A: "Have you finished checking the inventory?" B: "Yes sir, all present and correct."
See also: all, and, correct, present

politically correct

Describing statements or behavior careful to avoid offense or insensitivity. Our CEO is constantly being criticized in the media because he rarely makes politically correct speeches.
See also: correct

stand corrected

To admit that one was incorrect or has been proven wrong. A: "No, John, the wedding was in Nevada, not Utah." B: "Oops, I stand corrected."
See also: correct, stand

stand corrected

to admit that one has been wrong. I realize that I accused him wrongly. I stand corrected. We appreciate now that our conclusions were wrong. We stand corrected.
See also: correct, stand

politically correct

Also, PC or p.c. Showing an effort to make broad social and political changes to redress injustices caused by prejudice. It often involves changing or avoiding language that might offend anyone, especially with respect to gender, race, or ethnic background. For example, Editors of major papers have sent out numerous directives concerning politically correct language . This expression was born in the late 1900s, and excesses in trying to conform to its philosophy gave rise to humorous parodies.
See also: correct

stand corrected

Agree that one was wrong, as in I stand corrected-we did go to Finland in 1985. This idiom was first recorded in John Dryden's The Maiden Queen (1668): "I stand corrected, and myself reprove."
See also: correct, stand

all present and correct

used to indicate that not a single thing or person is missing.
1982 Bernard MacLaverty A Time to Dance She began to check it, scraping the coins towards her quickly and building them into piles. ‘All present and correct,’ she said.
See also: all, and, correct, present

poˌlitically corˈrect

(abbr. PC) used to describe language or behaviour that deliberately tries to avoid offending particular groups of people: These days everybody has to be politically correct. I even heard someone the other day calling a short person ‘vertically challenged’!
See also: correct

all ˌpresent and corˈrect

(British English) (American English all ˌpresent and acˈcounted for) (spoken) used to say that all the things or people who should be there are now there: ‘Now, is everybody here?’ ‘All present and correct, Sir!’
This is used in the army to inform an officer that none of the soldiers in his or her unit are missing, injured, etc.
See also: all, and, correct, present

politically correct

Avoidance of speaking or behaving in a way that would offend anyone’s sensibilities concerning race, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic levels, or politics. Surprisingly, this cliché of the latter twentieth century, well known enough to be sometimes abbreviated as P.C., was used in 1793 by J. Wilson in the U.S. House of Representatives: “‘The United States,’ instead of the ‘People of the United States,’ is the toast given. This is not politically correct” (cited by the OED). Presumably Mr. Wilson here was referring to precision in political language. The current meaning of the phrase did not surface until the mid-1900s and was a cliché by the 1990s. The negative, politically incorrect, is also sometimes used. A letter to the editor of the Chicago Daily Herald, writing about the proposed building of a Muslim mosque near ground zero in New York City, said, “Is it not ‘politically incorrect’ for a Muslim mosque to be built in this area?” (Georgene Beazley, August 21, 2010). And a character discussing a possible suspect, “Just keep an eye on him. These guys usually screw up. Most of them don’t think what they’re doing is wrong, just politically incorrect” (Nevada Barr, Burn, 2010).
See also: correct
References in periodicals archive ?
(71.) This "rule" may seem a somewhat oversimplified encapsulation of the holding in the correctable disabilities cases.
"He's seeing a back specialist about it, but it is correctable without the need for an operation.
In the process of excluding associated diseases, you will find perhaps one out of every five or six patients with correctable causes of the aphthosis: anemia; deficiencies of B vitamins, folate, iron, or zinc; or gluten-sensitive enteropathy, or sprue, from a Dutch word meaning, "canker sore.
Her counsel, Duncan Pratt, told the court her condition was "eminently correctable".
The larger goal...should not be made to suffer from one silly but correctable blunder."
Gary Franks of Connecticut, opposed the RJA, saying social problems are not correctable by defining remedies in black and white terms.
She also has spina bifida but this should be correctable. Customer adviser Amanda and husband Wayne, 23, a trainee mechanic, said Piper is a "miracle little fighter".
Last year she finished her PhD at City University, and was based at the Institute of Optometry her research was in collaboration with Professor Bruce Evans and Professor David Thomson and focused on improving the detection of correctable visual loss in older people.
School children will be medically examined and parents/teachers advised on correctable disabilities and nutritional deficiencies.
"Watching film, we see correctable mistakes," South coach Travis Johnson said of the 10-7 loss to North Medford.
Residents need to stay vigilant, not just for the beetle itself but for any correctable shortfalls they see in how the eradication is proceeding.
Despite the importance of detecting and treating vision problems caused by refractive errors (i.e., correctable visual impairment [CVI]), a limited number of studies have attempted to determine the proportion of persons with diabetes whose poor vision could be corrected with accurately prescribed glasses or contact lenses.
Hypospadias is generally correctable by surgery, but complications from such procedures and psychosocial problems can result.